Serbia

Bugarka

Bugarka is a dance for both men and women from the village of Zhagubitsa in Northeast Serbia, Vlach area. The dance is performed with instrumental accompaniment. The dance pattern includes 4 figures.

Presented in 2008 by Daniela Ivanova. View the pdf here.

Cupanica

This dance comes from the Bačka region (also known as the Pannonian region) where the Croatian people live in the areas between the Danube and Tisa Rivers. In numerous debates and written articles about these people, they are often referred to as the Bunjevci and Šokci. The region is situated around the ancient town of Bač - which was once a district and also the seat of the Catholic Church. This is how it got its Slavic place-name. The migration of the
Dalmatian Croats in the Bačka region (upon liberation from the Turks) did not happen at the same time. Their arrival occurred from the beginning of the 15th to the end of the 17th century. Despite the long period of their being among other Pannonian peoples, the Bačka Croats have
survived and kept their speech patterns ("ikavian") as well as their wealth of costumes and art forms. This dance is done during wedding and other social gatherings. The bagpipe (gajde) used to be the traditional instrument played for this music; today the tambura orchestra is used. The dance was learned by Željko Jergan in 1989 from village group from Tavankut at Đakovački Vezovi Festival.

Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View pdf here.

Niška Rumenka

This is a dance from the city of Niš, southern Serbia. This used to be a women’s dance, with men joining for Fig II, but is now danced by all.
Pronunciation:  NISH-kah roo-MEHN-kah
Music:  2/4 meter  Serbian Folk Dance, Vol. 3, Track 8
Formation:  Open circle, belt hold or V-pos

Presented by Miroslav “Bata” Marčetić in 2012. View pdf here.

Pembe

This dance comes from the city of Vranje and the Vranjsko Polje region in southern Serbia.
Pronunciation:  PEHM-beh
Music:  4/4 meter  Serbian Folk Dance, Vol. 3, Track 3
Formation:  Open circle, hands held at shoulder height, slightly fwd, bent at elbows

Presented by Miroslav “Bata” Marčetić in 2012. View pdf here.

Pembe - Gypsy Variation

This dance comes from the city of Vranje and the Vranjsko Polje region in southern Serbia.
Pronunciation:  PEHM-beh
Music:  4/4 meter  Serbian Folk Dance, Vol. 3, Track 5
Formation:  Open circle of dancers; alternating M and W, M face out and W face in, holding hands at shldr height, arms almost straight, so that they form an inner circle of men and an outer circle of women. Turn body slightly twd LOD. Note: When a woman dances in the man’s position, she should dance the woman’s steps.

Presented by Miroslav “Bata” Marčetić in 2012. View pdf here.

Polomka

This dance comes from eastern Serbia.
Pronunciation: poh-LOHM-kah
Music:  2/4 meter (counted as 1-e-&-a-, 2-e-&-a-)  Serbian Folk Dance, Vol. 3, Track 4
Formation:  Open circle, hands in belt hold, or V-pos.
Styling:  Very small, light steps (not stampy)

Presented by Miroslav "Bata" Marčetić in 2012. View pdf here.