Italy

Balloindodici

From Umbria, central Italy, Balloindodici is a Contradance belonging to the family of “Gigues." It was cast off 30 years ago and then rediscovered in the territories between Val di Chiana and Orvieto. The choreography shows traces of the influence of the French Quadrille. Translation: "Dance in 12." Presented in 2008 by Roberto Bagnoli. View the pdf here.

Bassanello

Bassanello comes from Veneto, a region in Northeast Italy, and is a very popular dance deriving from the Alpagota tradition in the Belluno province. The name refers to a small area in this province. It is a courtship dance done at the beginning of a wedding banquet, danced by the married couples, parents and witnesses. Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View the pdf here.

Contradanza

This is among the most common dances in Sicily, and is currently danced during weddings and other festivities. It is also known as Cuntradanza and Quattrigghia, and follows only in part the rules of the French Contradanse, from which it derives.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Courenta

From Piedmont, Val Varaita, it is also known as Courento. The name refers simply to a category of dance. This is one of the valley dances from the former Occitania region which ranged from the Alps to the Pyrenees, from the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. Its antecedents are in doubt, most likely deriving from Renaissance dances. Like other dances from the same valley, it is followed by another sequence of figures, called "Balet."

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2008. View the pdf here.

Do Pasi

This dance comes from Veneto, in Verona and belongs to the group of dances called "Soti" - dances related to the German Schottische and widespread in the province of Verona and known throughout the entire region by various names. This tune is played by Calicanto, one of the most important bands in the Italian folk-revival movement, active since 1981.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Galoppa

This dance comes from Emilia-Romagna and has a relatively recent origin. Galoppa appeared for the first time in the first half of 19th century as a variation to the polka, called Gallop. Today it can be found in the region of Bologna in the valleys Savena and Reno.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Giga

This is a dance from Emilia-Romagna. Like the Piedmontese Gigo, the Giga from Emilia is a widely
spread, popular dance in 6/8 rhythm. It is danced in couples, and belongs to the group called “Balli Staccati” (without touching) of the Bologna Mountains (Valle del Savena, Valle del Setta).

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Moneco—not taught

This dance from Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy is also called Muneco. It is a kind of Contradance very well known both in Emilia-Romagna and Polesine (Veneto). According to many researchers it comes from a French dance called Monaco brought into Italy by the French Napoleonic Army and danced in the territory of Ferrara.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Passu Torrau

Passu Torrau comes from the territory of Mamoiada, Nuoro in Sardinia. It consists, differently from other kinds of Sardinian dances, having two different steps. Passu means "step" and torrau means “to come back." The song to the dance, Amore Contrariadu (Complicated Love), is played by the group Janas.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2008. View pdf here.

 

Spagnoletto

This dance is from Emilia-Romagna. The fiddle tune has been widely spread in Italy since the
Reinassance. Orally transmitted, it is still played in the Emilian Appennine area retaining the original name and melody. The name of the dance has no dance-related meaning. However, it means “spindle” and also is the name of a cigar.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Sbrando—NOT TAUGHT

This dance is for men from Piedmont, in northwestern Italy. Known also as "Brando" and coming from the region of Langhe-Roero-Monferrato, this is a dance attributed to conscripts; played by the Tre Martelli Band,who are committed to studying, recovering, and spreading traditional Piedmontes music.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2008. View pdf here.

Scotis

This dance is a couple dance related to the Polka family. Passing through the lower middle-class environments, it arrived in the rural world. This version is very common in Valnerina, in the territory of Norcia.
Pronunciation:  SHOH-tees
Music:  CD: Danze Italiane Vol 1, Band 10  4/4 meter
Formation:  Couples in large circle facing LOD, W to R of M, in ballroom position opened slightly to face LOD.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2008. View pdf here.

Sor Cesare

From Tuscany/Umbria, this is a kind of Mazurka dating back to the second half of the last century. It originated most likely in Tuscany from a narrative song. The song, narrating the history of Sor Cesare and the girl Nina, was released by the composer during country fairs through the selling of handbills.
Pronunciation:  sohr CHEH-sah-reh
Music:  CD: Danze Italiane Vol 1, Band 12  3/4 meter
Formation:  Couples in a large circle facing LOD, W to R of M. M takes W L hand in his L and placing his R arm about W waist. W holds skirt to side with R hand.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli 2008. View pdf here.

Su Falkittu

From Nuoro, Sardinia. Sardinia (in particular, the central inland Barbagia) is the Italian region which has most conserved the ancient traditions of ethnic dance. Dancing in the village square on feast days of local saints is common throughout the year. This dance has been assembled with the steps of the circle variation of "Ballittu." Translation: "The Little Falcon."

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2008. View pdf here.

Tresso

This dance comes from Piedmont, Val Varaita. It is one of the most beautiful dances from the former Occitania region (which ranged from the Alps to the Pyrenees, from the Mediterrean Sea to the Atlantic Ocean) and typical of Val Varaita. It has been revived in recent years, because of its choreography and dynamic quality. It is the only dance that needs six people to be danced—three men and three women. Like other dances from the same valley, it is then followed by another sequence of figures, called "Balet." The name of the dance means “braid.”

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Tarantella Bim Bom Ba

The first Tarantella from Campania dates back to the 7th century, but only in the 1700s did it become very popular as a variation of the “Ballo di Sfessania” and of the “Ntrezzata.” Rhythm is 3/4 or 6/8, very lively and there are frequent hints to courtship movements. The song to this dance, Oi mamma ca mo vene is by Roberto de Simone.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2008. View pdf here.