Hungary

Al Je Ljepo

Bosnian Croats (Bošnjaci) migrated to the Hungarian part of the Baranja region near the town of Pécs (Pećuh) at the end of the 17th century. Despite the long period of their being among other nationalities, they have survived and kept their speech patterns as well as their wealth of all folk forms, thanks to the village elders. Their rich and unique folk songs reflect daily life of the people - work in the house, in the farmyard, in the field, the joys and the sorrows of everyday life. Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View the pdf here.

Jabuke - Marice

Baranja is an area which straddles the border between northeastern Croatia and southwestern Hungary. Croatians (Bošnjaci & Šokci), who have lived there for many generations, inhabit the villages in Hungary near the town of Pécs (Pećuh). Their dances retain their Slavic character, with little or no influence from the surrounding Hungarian culture. The folk songs, music, costumes and dance are today only celebrated during family gatherings, church celebrations or weddings, thanks to the village elders. Željko was researching around the city of Pécs in the summer of 1992.

Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View pdf here.

Na dvi strane

More than 70,000 Croatians inhabit the southern, central and western parts
of Hungary today, where they continue to preserve the heritage, language
and culture of their ancestors. Baranja is an area which straddles the border
between northeastern Croatia and southwestern Hungary. Croatians, who
have lived there for many generations, inhabit the villages in Hungary near
the town of Pécs. Their dances retain their Slavic character, with little or no
influence from the surrounding Hungarian culture. Željko was researching
Croatian culture in the summer of 1992 around the city of Pécs.

Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View pdf here.