Greece

Adanali

This urban Greek dance is performed to a Turkish song with the same name which became popular among Greeks and Armenians. The dance is a simple Sta Dyo (two step) Misirlou-type dance as seen on youtube.com. Presented by Stephen Kotansky in 2010. View the pdf here.

Ai Giorgis

This couple dance version of Ai Giorgis is from the Ionian Sea island of Kythira in Greece. There is also a line dance version of Ai Giorgis. Kythira, along with the Ionian islands and some other areas, was never occupied by the Turks and was influenced by Venetians. Ai Giorgis is a dance unique to Kythira. Presented in 2013 by Lilian Vlandi. View the pdf here.

Aloniotikos

Aloniotikos is a three-measure dance from the Village of Alona in Northern Greece. It is also referred to as Cho Cho or Tso Tso and is essentially a Pousteno/Beranche/Leventikos-type dance in 4/4 time. Another common name is Armensko Oro. Presented by Stephen Kotansky in 2010. View the pdf here.

Fourlana

This dance is from the Ionian Sea island of Corfu. The dance originated in the Italian city of Firuli.
Islands in the Ionian Sea often have strong Italian cultural influences. Although not strictly necessary in the traditional form, dancers in Corfu today tend to follow a specific choreography. The dance is particularly happy and is a well-loved dance on Corfu.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

Ikariotikos from Ikaria

Ikaria is an island in the east Aegean Sea. It derives its name from Icarus, the son of Daedalus who, according to Greek mythology, fell into the sea nearby. Τoday, Icaria is considered one of the world's five “Blue Zones” – places where the population regularly lives to an advanced age (one in three make it to their 90s). This is due to healthy diets and lifestyle.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

Kavodoritikos

This dance is from the Aegean Sea island of Evia in Greece and is a typical island-style syrtos dance with a couple dance variation included.
Pronunciation:  Kah-voh-doh-REE-tee-kohs  Translation: See the end of this dance description
Music:  2/4 meter  Timeless Sounds, Track 6
Formation:  Open circle, leader on R, front basket, L over R.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

 

Kiladiotiko

Kiladiotiko is a dance from the town of Kilada, about 40 miles SE of Nafplion, in NE Peloponnese. I learned this dance from the local folk dance group in Nafplion. Oddly enough it is often danced to Island-style syrtó music, often from Naxos.

Pronunciation: KIHL-ah-dee-AW-tee-koh

Music: 4/4 meter CD: Balkan and Beyond – Stockton 2009, Band 4.
Formation: Line of dancers, leader on R, high W-pos

Presented by Lee Otterholt in 2009. View pdf here.

Nikendre

This dance is a men’s dance from the Aegean Sea island of Amorgos. This island was featured in two popular films, The Big Blue (1988) and Ariadni (2002).
Pronunciation:  nee-kehn-DREH
Music:  2/4 meter  Timeless Sounds, Track 5
Formation:  Lines of dancers in T-pos.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

Plataniotiko Nero

This dance is from the Aegean island of Samos and is typical of the island Syrto or Ballos style dance. The island of Samos produces very good wine, olives, and oil. Pythagoras, the famous mathematician, was from Samos.
Pronunciation:  plah-tah-nee-OH-tee-koh neh-ROH Translation: Water from Platanos Village
Music:2/4 meter (Slow-Quick-Quick)  Timeless Sounds, Track 4
Formation:  Open circle with leader on R, arms in a W-pos.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

Popova Kerka

Literally, “the Priest’s Daughter,” this dance comes from the area around Florina in Northern Greece. It was presented by Yannis Konstantinou who comes from a family of excellent dancers from Alona. It is an interesting 11-measure dance which reminds me of Zhenska Raka and parts of Nevestinsko Oro

Presented by Stephen Kotansky in 2010. View pdf here.

Syrtòs Kitrinou

This dance was choreographed by Maurits and Tineke van Geel in 2009. The leader calls the changing of the figures. The song is a Greek Gypsy folk song, Nais Balamo. This song was originally sung by Giorgos Katsaris, the music and the lyrics by Dionysis Tsaknis. This particular version is sung by Eleni Vitali.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2011. View pdf here.

Syrtos Samothrakis

This dance is from the north Aegean sea island of Samothrakis.
Pronunciation:  seer-TOHS sah-moh-THRAH-kees  Translation: Syrtos from Samothrace
Music:
2/4 meter (Slow-Quick-Quick)  Timeless Sounds, Track 1
Formation:  Open circle, hands in W-pos, alternating W and M along the line of dancers.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

Tsirigotikos

These two dances represent first the original slow traditional syrtos and secondly an updated version which is a jumpy syrtos. The Island of Kythira is also known as Tsirigo, which gives this dance its name.
Pronunciation:  tsee-ree-GOH-tee-kohs
Music:  4/4 meter  Timeless Sounds, Track 7 and 8
Formation:  Open circle of dancers in T-pos.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

Zonaradikos

Zonaradikos is a very common line dance in the Thracian part of (Northeastern) Greece. (More or less the same dance is danced in the Thracian part of Bulgaria, where the dance would most often be called “Pravo trakijsko horo,” or simply a “Pravo.”) The dance has two different forms of the basic step, plus many variations on each, especially the second “in and out” basic step. The word “zonaradikos” derives from the Greek word for “belt.” This does not necessarily mean that it should be danced with a belt hold; the word refers rather to the “belt” of dancers following the leader.

Presented by Lee Otterholt in 2009. View pdf here.