Bulgaria

Alulenu from Vrav

Alulenu from Vrav is a dance for both men and women from the village of Vrav in Northwest Bulgaria, (the Vidin–Danube river area). “Alunelu” is a Vlach word that means “hazelnut.” The dance is performed with instrumental accompaniment. The dance pattern includes 4 figures. Presented in 2008 by Daniela Ivanova. View the pdf here.

Deleormansko Vlaško

This is a Vlach dance from the Deleorman region in Northern Bulgaria or Severnjaško. Deleorman is an area which straddles the Bulgarian-Romanian border on both sides of the Danube River. The dance reflects influences from both countries in its style of performance, steps, and dance patterns. The dance was observed from local dance groups in Northern Bulgaria. During a joint teaching session in the Netherlands in 1979, the Romanian dance specialist Theodor Vasilescu heard this recording from the orchestra “Horo” from Russe, a town on the Bulgarian side of the Danube River. He spontaneously shared some additional material known in the Romanian part of the Deleorman region, which illustrates the dance similarities on both sides of the border.

Presented by Jaap Leegwater in 2011. View pdf here.

Dobro Ljo

This dance is a variation on the popular Pravo Trakijsko Horo. It was learned from Leo Waudman.
Pronunciation:  doh-BROH lee-oh  Translation: Oh, Dobra (woman's name)
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 5
Formation:  Mixed lines. Hands joined down in V-pos or belt hold, L arm over R arm.
Steps & Styling: Knees bent slightly in an “earthy” style.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Drianovska Râčenica II

A line râčenica from the region of Drianovo in North-East Bulgaria. In 1998, Yves Moreau introduced a dance also called Drianovska Râčenica with different and slower music (a capella song), and therefore decided to call this one Drianovska Râčenica II, to avoid confusion. The version described below was introduced by Belčo Stanev in Germany to the popular folk song Trâgnali mi sa Drianovskite bulki.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

Ginka

This is a dance performed to the popular Pirin Macedonian song “Mitro le, Mitro” (Southwest Bulgaria). When performed by men only, this dance is danced with high jumps. The dance pattern includes 1 figure.
Pronunciation:  GIHN-kah
Music:  From Bulgaria and Beyond CD, Band 6.  7/8 meter (SQQ)
Formation:  Open circle; hands joined in V-pos, facing LOD.

Presented by Daniela Ivanova in 2008. View pdf here.

Glava li ta boli

A variation of the Pravo Horo from the Rhodopes (Pravo Rodopsko) on a popular song interpreted by Nadežda
Hvojneva. Learned from Belo Stanev, Germany, 1999.
Pronunciation: GLAH-vah lee tah BOH-lee
Music: Yves Moreau CD YM-UOP-07, track 10 3/4 meter
Formation: Open circle. Face slightly R of ctr. Wt on L. Hands in W-pos.
Styling: Calm and proud

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2007. View pdf here.

Glaviniška Kopanica

This Kopanica belongs to a group of well known Kopanici from western Bulgaria. Others in this family include: Lamba Lamba, Plovdiska Kopanica, Ludo Kopano, Bistrička Kopanica, et.al. Kotansky based the steps below on several versions of this dance learned over the past 35 years from Stefan Vaglarov, Georgi Kinski, Belčo Stanev, and others.

Presented by Stephen Kotansky in 2010. View pdf here.

Harmanlijska Râčenica

Line râčenica from the region around Harmanli in Eastern Thrace. Observed by Yves Moreau at folk festival in Haskovo, June 1966. Dance can be done to any basic 8-meas Thracian râčenica tune.
Translation: Râčenica from the region of Harmanli.

Pronunciation: hahr-mahn-LEE-skah ruh-che-NEE-tsah

Music: 7/8 meter (QQS) CD: Yves Moreau Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2009, Band 4.

Formation: Mixed open circle. Hands in W-pos. Wt on L, face ctr.

Styling: Earthy, slight knee bend.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

 

Ihtimanska Kopanica

This is a women’s Kopanica from lhtiman, Šop region (Western Bulgaria). The word “Kopaníca” is
derived from the verb “Kopaja” (“to dig”). In dance and music terminology, Kopaníca means a dance in 11/8 meter (2-2-3-2-2) and it is also the name of its basic step.
Pronunciation:  ee-tee-MAHN-skah KOP-ah-nee-tsah
Music:  11/8 meter  Bulgarian Folk Dances with Jaap Leegwater, counted as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Stockton Edition, Track 6
Formation:  Open circle. Hands belt hold, R arm under, L arm over.

Presented by Jaap Leegwater in 2011. View pd here.

Kapetan Vojvoda

This is a type of Pravo Horo in ten measures that is danced to a popular folk song about Kapetan
Vojvoda, a man whose real name was Kostadin Nunkov, who fought the Ottoman Turks in the region of Blagoevgrad.
Pronunciation:  kah-peh-TAHN voy-VOH-dah  Translation: the captain, the leader
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 1
Formation:  Mixed lines. Hands in W-pos. Face R of ctr (LOD), wt on L ft.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Kardamska Zborenka

Zborenka is a common type of dance throughout Dobrudža in North-East Bulgaria. This version is from the region of Kardam near the Romanian border. Learned from Živko Petrov.
Pronunciation: Kahr-DAHM-skah ZBOH-rehn-kah
Music:2/4 meter CD:  Yves Moreau Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2009, Band 8.
Formation: Mixed open circle or line. Face ctr, wt on L. Hands joined down at sides, V-pos, or short lines in front basket hold.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

Koljovo Horo

This dance is a variation of the popular Râka and Tropanka widespread throughout Dobrudža. This version comes from an area of villages west of Varna.
Pronunciation:  KOH-lyoh-voh hoh-ROH  Translation: Kolyo's (man's name) dance
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 3
Formation:  Mixed lines or open circle; hands joined up in W-pos; wt on L ft, face ctr.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Komarevsko Horo

A dance from Komarevo (Mosquitoville) near Pleven, North Bulgaria. It combines elements of the Pajduško in 5/8 meter and the Dajovo in 9/8 meter. It is danced to the song Radka Platno Tâe made famous by the legendary singer Boris Mašalov. Learned in Bulgaria from Živko Petrov in 1970.

Pronunciation:  Koh-MAH-ref-skoh hoh-ROH
Music: Yves Moreau CD YM-UOP-07, track 7
Rhythm: 5/8 + 9/8. Counted here as 1-2, 1-2-3, 1-2, 1-2, 1-2, 1-2-3 or
Q-S-Q-Q-Q-S (1,2, 3,4,5,6)
Formation: Short mixed lines, hands joined down in V-pos. Face LOD, wt on L.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2007. View pdf here.

Krajdunavsko Horo

The title translates as “Dance from the Danube River Area.” The Danube River forms the natural border between Romania and Bulgaria. The influence of the Vlach minorities is very present in the musical and dance folklore of North Bulgaria. The Vlachs (derived from Wallachia, now a province of Romania) were originally a nomad tribe. They settled in different areas of the Balkan Peninsula. Many villages in N.W. Bulgaria and the Danube plain region have a high concentration of Vlachs or Vlach-related descendants. They brought with them their own language, traditions, and costume. One of those is the ritual known as Kalušari. The North Bulgarian dances with Vlach influences are known as Vlaško or Krajdunavsko. Very characteristic are the syncopations in the rhythm and stamps of the dances. The following Krajdunavski variations were learned by Jaap Leegwater from Jordan Jordanov in the town of Russe in the spring of 1979.

Presented by Jaap Leegwater in 2011. View pdf here.

Liljano Mome

A variation of the popular Širto type of dance common throughout the Pirin-Macedonia region of
Bulgaria. This version was introduced by Belčo Stanev from Varna.
Pronunciation: lee-LYAH-noh MOH-meh
Music:7/8 meter (SQQ) CD:  Yves Moreau Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2009, Band 9
Formation: Mixed open circle; hands in W-pos; face LOD, wt on L.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

Mali Izvorski Opas

A variation on the popular Opas dance type found throughout Dobrudža. From the village of
Mali Izvor near the town of Dobrič.
Translation: Opas from the village of Mali Izvor
Pronunciation: MAH-lee EEZ-vohr-skee OH-pahss

Music:2/4 meter CD:  Yves Moreau Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2009, Band 6.

Formation: Short lines , belt hold, L over R or front basket hold or optional V-Pos. Wt on L. Face ctr.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

 

 

 

Mehmede

“Memede, dobâr junače” (“Mehmed, you are a brave lad”) is the first line of the song to which the dance was originally performed. The patterns described here are from the village of Jakoruda, Velingradsko district in the Rhodopes.
Pronunciation:  MEHH-meh-deh
Music:  5/8 meter counted 1-2 1-2-3 or 1-2 or Q-S
Bulgarian Folk Dances with Jaap Leegwater, Stockton Edition, Track 14

Presented by Jaap Leegwater in 2011. View pdf here.

Mandrile

This is a dance performed mainly by women from the village of Vrav in Northwest Bulgaria, the Vidin–Danube river area. “Mandrile” is Vlach word that means “beauty.” The dance is performed with instrumental accompaniment. The dance pattern is symmetrical: 8 measures to the right, 8 measures to the left.
Pronunciation:  MUHN-dreh-leh
Music:  Ya si te daruvam surtseto, dushata CD (I Give You My Heart, 5/8 meter, counted QS My Soul) Songs & Dances from Bulgaria, Macedonia, & Serbia. Band 6. Dances from Serbia & Northwest Bulgaria. Band 3.

Presented by Daniela Ivanova in 2008. View pdf here.

 

Maneaua

Maneaua is a Rom (gypsy) dance from the south of Romania which reflects the oriental influence. It is usually done in Oltenia, Muntenia and Dobrogea (costal area of Danube) and also in few Bulgarian villages of the north.
Pronunciation:  mah-N(EH)AH-oo-ah
Music:  Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu, Special Edition, Band 13 or Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu
Vol. 3, Band 8  2/4 meter

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2008. View pdf here.

 

Mariikinata

This is a dance choreographed to accompany the popular Macedonian song (“Mama na Mariika Dumashe”) based on a traditional dance pattern from Pirin Macedonia known as Deninka. The dance here is performed both by men and women, and with vocal and instrumental accompaniment. The dance pattern includes 3 figures.

Presented by Daniela Ivanova in 2008. View pdf here.

Momino Horo

This is an arrangement by Yves Moreau based on traditional Vlach women’s dance steps from the
region of Lom on the Danube in Northwest Bulgaria.
Pronunciation:  moh-MEE-noh hoh-ROH  Translation: Young women's dance
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 4
Formation:  Line or open circle with hands joined in W-pos. Face R of ctr, wt on L.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Oj Dimitro Le

This is a dance from Northwest Bulgaria that Yves learned from Belčo Stanev.
Pronunciation:  oy dee-MEE-troh leh  Translation: Oh, Dimitra (woman’s name)
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 2
Formation:  Mixed lines. Hands joined down in V-pos. Face ctr, wt on L ft.
Steps & Styling: Light and happy.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Perniška Kopanica

This dance is composed of two variations on the widespread Kopanica danced throughout the Šopluk region. It comes from the area near Pernik, southwest of Sofia, and it was learned from Ilija Rizov.
Pronunciation:  PEHR-neesh-kah KOH-pah-nee-tsah  Translation: Kopanica from the region of Pernik
Music:  11/8 meter. 1-2, 1-2, 1-2-3, 1-2, 1-2 or Q-Q-S-Q-Q, counted as 1-2-3-4-5 Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 6
Formation:  Mixed short lines. Hands joined down in V-pos or belt hold, L arm over R arm. Face
slightly R of ctr.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Pirinska Chetvorka

This dance pattern from Pirin Mountain folklore region (southwest Bulgaria) is known under different names and there is not one particular song to accompany the dance. In this instances, the popular Pirin song “Kalino Kalinche” was chosen. . The dance is for men and women and includes one figure in 8 measures.
Pronunciation:  pee-RIHN-skah cheht-VOHR-kah
Music:  From Bulgaria and Beyond 2007 CD, Band 7.  7/8 meter (SQQ)
Formation:  Open circle; hands joined in V-pos, facing LOD.

Presented by Daniela Ivanova in 2008. View pdf here.

 

Rade Rade

Rade Rade is the name of the accompanying song and is derived from the name Radka. The dance is done to the accompanying song (horovodna pesen) Rade Rade, Bjala Rade, and comes from the village of Darževo in the region of the town of Yambol, East Trakia. It was originally introduced and taught by the Bulgarian choreographer Nikilaj Cvetkov.

Presented by Jaap Leegwater in 2011. View pdf here.

Shalauna

This is a Vlach dance for both men and women from the village of Lazour in northwest Bulgaria, the Danube river area. The dance is performed with instrumental accompaniment. The dance figure includes one basic symmetrical dance pattern which could have one or more variations.

Presented by Daniela Ivanova in 2008. View pdf here.

Smilyana

Daniela choreographed Smilyana using the melody from the repertoire of a famous Bulgarian
singer, Lubka Rondova, and the melody was composed by the singer’s mother. The music is
arranged by Vladimir Mollov. This a song between a daughter and her mother. The daughter
will be married the next day and she asks her mother to come comb her hair and prepare her for
the wedding, because her new relatives and will come the next day and take her with them.

Presented by Daniela Ivanova in 2008. View pdf here.

Staro Bansko Horo

Dance from the region of Bansko in the Pirin Mountains of South-West Bulgaria. Observed by Yves
Moreau at a Folk Festival in the nearby town of Razlog, summer 1969.
Translation: Old dance from Bansko.
Pronunciation: STAH-roh BAHN-skoh hoh-ROH

Music: 7/8 meter (SQQ) CD: Yves Moreau Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2009, Band 2.
Formation: Mixed open circle or short line, hands slightly fwd in W-pos. Face slightly R of ctr,

Presented by Yves Moreau inn 2009. View pdf here.

Staro Gradešniško Horo

The dance is named after the town of Doina Gradešnica, a small town in the Pirin ethnographic region of Bulgaria. It is performed to the accompanying song Trâgna Moma Za Voda (A Girl Left to Get Some Water).
Pronunciation:  STAH-roh grah-dehss-NEESH-koh hoh-ROH
Music:  2/4 meter  Bulgarian Folk Dances with Jaap Leegwater, Stockton Edition, Track 21
Formation:  Circle; hands in V-position.

Presented by Jaap Leegwater in 2011. View pdf here.

Su Balitto

From the territory of Nuoro in Sardinia, Su Balitto is a dance done in all the north of the island. The
name means “the little dance.”
Pronunciation: SOO bah-LEET-toh

Music: 6/8 meter CD: Danze Italiane Vol. 1, Band 16 (“Su Falcittu”)
Formation: Closed circle for any number of people. Stand facing into the center, close to each
other, hands joined, forearms parallel to the floor. There is a designated leader that
calls the step changes. Change is indicated by the leader yelling “AYE-OH.”

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Trite Pâti from Sliven

Trite Pâti is a very popular type of dance in Eastern Thrace and Strandža regions. The variations
described here are popular ones from the region of Sliven.
Pronunciation:  TREE-teh puht-ee from SLEEH-vehn
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 9
Formation:  Short lines. Hands in W-pos. Face LOD, wt on L. Face slightly R of ctr. Steps & Styling: Earthy feeling. Proud. Sharp movements.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Varnenski Kjuček

This dance is from the region of Varna on the Black Sea coast. It is known under various names:
Varnensko Horo, Gagaužko, Varnenski Tanc etc. This version is typical of the variations among the
Gagauzi (Christian Turks) and shows a strong Turkish influence as well as general characteristics of Black Sea dance forms. The finger snapping represents wooden spoons.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Večeraj Sino

This is a dance from the Pomak (Moslem) villages of the Western Rhodopes related to the Širto form.
Pronunciation: veh-CHEH-righ SEE-noh  Translation: Eat dinner, my son (Name of accompanying folk song)
Music:  3/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 8
Formation:  Mixed lines. Hands joined down in W-pos. Face slightly R of ctr.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Angelovata

This is a dance from Gorna Lipnitsa (North Bulgaria). It is a dance for both men and women, holding palms in a circle. The performers are randomly arranged – no pattern is followed (man, woman, man, etc). Men dance with a rather characteristic “jumpy” fashion compared to women, and particularly the squats which - depending on the mood - are performed in a variety of ways.

Presented by Daniela Ivanova in 2005. View pdf here.