Adama Veshamayim

Adama Veshamayim was choreographed in 2008 by Gadi Biton - one of Israel’s most popular and prolific choreographers, with well over 200 dances created through 2010. The evenings of dancing that he leads in Tel Aviv attract 750-1000 (!) dancers every week. The song is sung by Lehakat Segol, based on an American-Indian tune with words in Hebrew expressing Israeli sentiments. Presented by Erica Goldman in 2011. View the pdf here.

Adanali

This urban Greek dance is performed to a Turkish song with the same name which became popular among Greeks and Armenians. The dance is a simple Sta Dyo (two step) Misirlou-type dance as seen on youtube.com. Presented by Stephen Kotansky in 2010. View the pdf here.

Ahava Ktzara

Ahava Ktzara was created in 1992 and is one of the first dances choreographed by Gadi Biton. Gadi is one of Israel’s most popular and prolific choreographers, with well over 280 dances created through 2012. The dance was presented by Erica Goldman in 2013. View the pdf here.

Ahava Pshuta

Ahava Pshuta is one of many Israeli dances that feature pivot turns. In Hebrew, this movement is called a lahatz or a press turn because you are pressed close to your partner, and it is found in a large percentage of modern Israeli couple dances. It was choreographed by Roni Siman-Tov in 1983. Presented in 2013 by Erica Goldman. View the pdf here.

Ai Giorgis

This couple dance version of Ai Giorgis is from the Ionian Sea island of Kythira in Greece. There is also a line dance version of Ai Giorgis. Kythira, along with the Ionian islands and some other areas, was never occupied by the Turks and was influenced by Venetians. Ai Giorgis is a dance unique to Kythira. Presented in 2013 by Lilian Vlandi. View the pdf here.

Aj Lipo Ti Je

Slavonija is the largest and most fertile part of Croatia’s land. It borders Hungary and the Drava River on the north, the Sava River on the south, the Moslavina Region on the west and the Srijem Region on the east. For this reason, Slavonian folk traditions have remained unchanged for centuries. The wealth of this region is reflected in the dances, songs and costumes. The song “Aj lipo ti je” belongs to the “Drumarac” type (songs usually sung while walking to the field/party or home from the field/party. Sometimes they’ll sing in the “kolo” too. Presented in 2009 by Željko Jergan. View the pdf here.

Al Je Ljepo

Bosnian Croats (Bošnjaci) migrated to the Hungarian part of the Baranja region near the town of Pécs (Pećuh) at the end of the 17th century. Despite the long period of their being among other nationalities, they have survived and kept their speech patterns as well as their wealth of all folk forms, thanks to the village elders. Their rich and unique folk songs reflect daily life of the people - work in the house, in the farmyard, in the field, the joys and the sorrows of everyday life. Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View the pdf here.

Aloniotikos

Aloniotikos is a three-measure dance from the Village of Alona in Northern Greece. It is also referred to as Cho Cho or Tso Tso and is essentially a Pousteno/Beranche/Leventikos-type dance in 4/4 time. Another common name is Armensko Oro. Presented by Stephen Kotansky in 2010. View the pdf here.

Alulenu from Vrav

Alulenu from Vrav is a dance for both men and women from the village of Vrav in Northwest Bulgaria, (the Vidin–Danube river area). “Alunelu” is a Vlach word that means “hazelnut.” The dance is performed with instrumental accompaniment. The dance pattern includes 4 figures. Presented in 2008 by Daniela Ivanova. View the pdf here.

Ani More Nuse

Ani More Nuse is an extremely popular melody among Albanians all over the world. Choreographers have put many steps to this dance, but when Albanians just want to dance to this music at a party or social event most Albanians either do a simple step in a line or they dance individually. This dance attempts to recapture this flavor by combining these two elements in a little 2 figure arrangement. Presented in 2009 by Lee Otterholt. View the pdf here.

Ardeleana din câmpie

The Ardeleana family of dances are couple dances done in column formation. Partners face each other in two parallel lines, as in American contras and English country dances. Ardelenele are prevalent in the western part of Romania and found mostly in the regions of Bihor, Arad, and Banat. There are many variations in the region of Banat: Poarga, Ardeleana Jute, Mânânelul and De Doi. Couple dances there are elegant and usually involve sequences where the play of arms, circle movements, patterns and turns (by the woman) are harmonious. The style is characterized by small steps with knees flexed and on the balls of the feet, producing an effect of light, flowing movement. Presented in 2007 by Sonia Dion and Cristian Florescu. View the pdf here.

Babochka Motorochka

Bobochka Motorochka is from the repertoire of the Cossacks from Southern Russia, as danced by Ozorniye Naigrishi folklore ensemble from Donetsk, Ukraine, and adapted by Hennie Konings. The dance was first presented in 2007 in Ukraine. 

Babochka = little butterfly and Motorochka = little motor

These words should not be understood literally, but refer to a person who is beautiful (like a butterfly) and full of energy (like a motor).

The dance was introduced in 2008 by Radboud Koop. View the pdf here.

Balloindodici

From Umbria, central Italy, Balloindodici is a Contradance belonging to the family of “Gigues." It was cast off 30 years ago and then rediscovered in the territories between Val di Chiana and Orvieto. The choreography shows traces of the influence of the French Quadrille. Translation: "Dance in 12." Presented in 2008 by Roberto Bagnoli. View the pdf here.

Bassanello

Bassanello comes from Veneto, a region in Northeast Italy, and is a very popular dance deriving from the Alpagota tradition in the Belluno province. The name refers to a small area in this province. It is a courtship dance done at the beginning of a wedding banquet, danced by the married couples, parents and witnesses. Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View the pdf here.

Bay Nian 拜年

The music of Bay Nian (拜年) creates the highly festive atmosphere of the Taiwanese New Year, while the dance movements emulate the actions the Taiwanese take when making ceremonial
calls or pasting couplets on the door (as in the photo) at the New Year. When dancers say "Gong-Xi" to each other they are congratulating each other on surviving the demons of the past year. This dance was choreographed by Si-Min Wang in 1989. Presented in 2010 by Fang-Chich Chen. View the pdf here.

Believe

Believe is a modern Japanese recreational dance done in pairs. If there are enough dancers, this can be done as a mixer; otherwise it can be a dance for couples who remain together. Because movements are not done in any traditional ballroom position, this is an ideal dance for two women to do together. Presented in 2012 by Iwao Tamaoki. View the pdf here.

Benof Yaldut

Benof Yaldut was choreographed in 2000 by Eli Ronen and Israel Shiker. The song was written and is sung by Shlomo Artzi, one of Israel’s popular modern singer-songwriters. Choreographing a dance to a song by Shlomo Artzi will almost guarantee the dance will be popular wherever Israeli dances are done. Presented in 2011 by Erica Goldman. View the pdf here.

Bil ya rano, bil ya pozdno

Bil ya rano, bil ya pozdno was choreographed by Hennie Konings based on traditional dance material. The dance is of the type parnaya plyaska, i.e., a folkdance (plyaska) in couples (parnaya) and is set to a dance song of the Don Cossacks. The Don Cossacks live in southern Russia along the Don river that ends in the Asov Sea near the capital of the region, Rostov-na-Donu.

Translation: “Was I too early, was I too late?” from the first line of the accompanying song.

Presented in 2008 by Radboud Koop. View the pdf here.

Bogatym from Spisz

Bogatym from Spisz is another example of folk music being brought into the present day by
young singers and bands from the mountain regions of Poland. After many skirmishes and treaties with Czechoslovakia during the first half of the 20th century, the majority of the region of Spisz finds itself today in northern Slovakia (Spiš) and a small area in south eastern Poland. The people living in the area are considered górals (mountaineers) just like in Podhale and Orawa, with their own dialect and way of life. No matter which side of the political border, the costumes are similar, the steps the same, the music is shared and the folk scene is alive and well.

Presented in 2008 by Richard Schmidt. View the pdf here.

The Bonny Cuckoo

The Bonny Cuckoo was created by Gail Ticknor, Gail’s Maggots, 1996. Published in CDSS News, March-April 1986 and The Blind Harper Dances, Allison Thompson, ed. 2003. Paul Stamler says, “‘Bonny Cuckoo’ is a song, sung to the tune of “Sheebeg and Sheemore,” hence the name of the dance. Shirley Collins recorded it on her 1959 debut album on Folkways.”

Presented in 2009 by Bruce Hamilton. View the pdf here.

Bourrée Droite Du Pays Fort

This bourrée means “straight bourrée from the strong country.” It comes from the region of Sancerre in Upper Berry, which is called the “strong country” because of its energetic dances. Pierre Panis and Paul Bouart taught the dance to Louise and Germain Hébert, who introduced it at the 1968 Folk Dance Camp at The University of the Pacific, Stockton, California. Bourrées are the “real” French dances, and although their origin is unknown, they are widely spread throughout French territory.

Presented in 2007 by Michèle Brosseau and Germain Hébert. View the pdf here.

Braşoveanca

Braşoveanca is a couple dance with variations, some of which - including the one presented here - are mixers, where the dancers change partners. Mixers are very rare in the Romanian repertoire. This feature - changing partners - together with the melody, lead us to believe that this dance is an “adopted child” among Romanian dances. Nonetheless, if you are lucky enough to visit Braşov and get invited to a popular festivity, the residents will ask you to join in their typical dances, and Braşoveanca is sure to be one of them.

Presented in 2010 by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu. View the pdf here.

Bugarka

Bugarka is a dance for both men and women from the village of Zhagubitsa in Northeast Serbia, Vlach area. The dance is performed with instrumental accompaniment. The dance pattern includes 4 figures.

Presented in 2008 by Daniela Ivanova. View the pdf here.

Bukovinskii Tanets – Буковинський танець

Bukovinskii Tanets is from the Bukovyna region of Ukraine. This region lies in western Ukraine on the southeastern slopes of the Carpathian mountains and in the Bukovynian foothills. The territory of Bukovyna is now between Ukraine and Romania. Dances from this region are lively and energetic, and characterized by high stepping and intricate tight foot stamping combinations. This dance was choreographed by George and Irina Arabagi.

Presented in 2012 by George & Irina Arabagi. View the pdf here.

Cajun Dance

There are three basic Cajun dances popular now: the Two-Step (with arm figures, it is called Jitterbug), the Waltz, and a modern version of the Jitterbug (also known as the Cajun Jig). The Two-Step and the Waltz, which are older, are found in several rhythmic and stylistic variations. Dances presented in 2012 by Jerry Duke. View the pdf here.

Canon Polska Schottische

The name “Canon” refers to the similarity of the Polska step to the phase-shifting of a sung round, or canon. Richard learned this dance from Sylvia Hartung at an informal dance party last year while teaching a workshop for Sylvia in Marienbad, Czech Republic. The German name for the dance is "Kanonischer" and Sylvia believes it is from Thuringia, located in the central part of Germany. "Canon" is the correct translation of Kanonischer (pronounced “kah nohn EE scher”), or to describe it for folk dancers, "Canon Polska Schottische."

Presented in 2011 by Richard Powers. View the pdf here.

Chocolate for Breakfast

This dance is by Brooke Friendly and Chris Sackett and was published in Impropriety II 2008. The tune is “Top o’ the Mornin’” by Jonathan Jensen, 2007.

Formation: Longways duple minor set.
Steps & Styling: Running step, slip step. Please also refer to English Country Dance Glossary.

Presented in 2011 by Bruce Hamilton. View the pdf here.

Cirandas

This dance was choreographed by Lucia Cordeiro in 2012 to six folk songs sung by Mariene de Castro (CD “Santo de Casa”). It is a kind of children’s play, done in circles and representative of Brazilian dances danced all over the country. It is also a collective dance performed by people of all ages and can be danced for hours. There are many variations to it, including the basic step, which imitates the waves of the sea, and the stamping of feet in front, which recalls the movements of indigenous native dances.

Presented in 2013 by Lucia Cordeiro. View the pdf here.

Circle Polka

Done to a lively melody accompanied by beautiful singing, the Circle Polka was created to teach the basic ordinary (zwykly) polka step to dancers of all ages. Poland literally has thousands of polka steps and variations that are unique to the folklore of its regions, but most people know these basic steps that are often done during social gatherings. I always teach this particular version to children and beginners of Polish folk dance, as it gives them a solid base for more complicated polka steps and helps them to learn a sense of direction when turning.

Presented in 2008 by Richard Schmidt. View the pdf here.

Čizme Moje

Prigorje Region, translated “by the hills,” is located in the environs of Croatia’s capital Zagreb where the “kaykavian” dialect is prevalent. A prominent dance in this area is “drmeš” (shaking dance – a fine, subtle shaking of the entire body) and was accepted a long time ago and is still danced today. Željko Jergan researched the Kašinsko Prigorje region, particularly a small village of Kašina Northwest of Zagreb, from 1975-1984.

Presented in 2009 by Željko Jergan. View the pdf here.

Clopoţelul

Pronunciation: kloh-poh-TSHEH-lool “Clopoţelul” means little bell.
Music: 2/4 meter Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu Romanian Realm Vol. 5, Band 3
Formation: Mixed circle of dancers facing ctr and hands joined in V-pos.
Steps & Styling: Grapevine:
Meas 1: Step L across in front of R (ct 1); step R to R (ct 2).
Meas 2: Step L across behind R (ct 1); step R to R (ct 2).
Meas 1-2 = one Grapevine.

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2010. View the pdf here.

Cockle Shells

This dance is from Charles Bolton, Retreads, Vol 1, 1985.
Music: 2/2 meter Bare Necessities, By Choice, Track 10
Bruce Hamilton, Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2011, Track 3
Formation: Longways duple minor set.
Steps & Styling: Running step. Please also refer to English Country Dance Glossary.

Presented by Bruce Hamilton in 2011. View the pdf here.

Coconiþa

Târnave is north of the county of Sibiu, on the Transylvanian Plain, between the two rivers in the region (Târnava Mica and Târnava Mare). Coconita falls in the category of women’s sung dances, very widespread in central Transylvania. It is a closed circle dance that generally moves in a clockwise direction. The CW direction indicates the archaic, ritualistic character of the dance. The verses sung are usually about marriage. The word coconia derives from cucoan (lady), referring to an elegant, noble, distinguished woman who may or may not be married.

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2007. View pdf here.

 

Contradanza

This is among the most common dances in Sicily, and is currently danced during weddings and other festivities. It is also known as Cuntradanza and Quattrigghia, and follows only in part the rules of the French Contradanse, from which it derives.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Corrido

The Mexican Corrido is a true folk ballad. Historically this form descended from the Spanish romance which flourished most brilliantly during the 14th and 15th centuries in Spain. The earliest Mexican example that bears a date was issued in Mexico City on August 19, 1684. The music for secular folk dances is in the form of songs. This dance, Corrido, has developed from the ballad form. Three characteristic steps are noted in this dance: “soldado,” a soldier style of dancing from the revolutionary days; a dipping step commonly called the “grapevine;” and a typical sideward step-close. Avis Landis, a member of the Research Committee of the Folk Dance Federation of California, introduced this dance to the Federation. Avis, who has been an active dancer and leader in the local Mexican colony in Oakland, danced Corrido in various parts of Mexico.

Presented by Bruce Mitchell in 2012. View the pdf here.

Courenta

From Piedmont, Val Varaita, it is also known as Courento. The name refers simply to a category of dance. This is one of the valley dances from the former Occitania region which ranged from the Alps to the Pyrenees, from the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. Its antecedents are in doubt, most likely deriving from Renaissance dances. Like other dances from the same valley, it is followed by another sequence of figures, called "Balet."

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2008. View the pdf here.

Csíkszentdomokosi Cepper

The Cepper could be considered a new-style dance, probably developing in the 19th or early 20th
century. While this dance is only found in the village of Felcsik, in all likelihood it developed from a dance or dances adopted from the urbanizing Saxon-Germans of the region; possibly brought from the city of Brassov, where lads learning a trade would follow their apprenticeship. Interestingly, one of the tunes played for this lively dance is also found in the Rábaköz region of Hungary, which borders Austria and has a large Schwab-Germans influence.

Presented by Dénes Dreisziger and Gissella Santayana in 2010. View pdf here.

Csíkszentdomokosi Csárdás

A new dance style known as the “Csárdás” swept through Hungary in the 19th century, a time when the countries of Europe were building the notion of a national identity and arrived later in Transylvania. As a new national dance, the Csárdás also went a long way towards homogenizing the dances of regions, and thus had a negative effect on the diversity of Hungarian dance. It is for this reason that remote regions are interesting. While the Csárdás ostensibly took over, wiping out the existing turning-style couple dances, in reality the elements and motifs of the more archaic dances merged with the new fashion, creating an interesting and no-less-diverse fusion of new and old. The Csíkszentdomokosi Csárdás, preserved to this day among the Szeklers of the Hargita Mountains, is a classic and beautiful example of this phenomenon.

Presented by Dénes Dreisziger and Gissella Santayana in 2010. View pdf here.

Csingerálás

There is a practice among Hungarian folk dancers to study dances from original recordings of villagers dancing. Partly due to the popularity of the world-renowned Szászcsavás Band, there are many recordings of gypsy dancing from that village. However, for this dance, we chose to teach steps exclusively from a recording that can be found on YouTube. We hope you refer back to that recording to learn and perfect this dance. The recording is of the musicians of the Szászcsavás Band dancing with their wives. In general, we are teaching the dance as done by Levente Mezei and his wife, found starting at 1 minute 50 seconds into the recording.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0swGFtHVaE&feature=related Please note that this physically and mentally challenging dance will be taught at an advanced level.Please note that this physically and mentally challenging dance will be taught at an advanced level.

Presented by Dénes Dreisziger and Gissella Santayana in 2010. View pdf here.

 

Cupanica

This dance comes from the Bačka region (also known as the Pannonian region) where the Croatian people live in the areas between the Danube and Tisa Rivers. In numerous debates and written articles about these people, they are often referred to as the Bunjevci and Šokci. The region is situated around the ancient town of Bač - which was once a district and also the seat of the Catholic Church. This is how it got its Slavic place-name. The migration of the
Dalmatian Croats in the Bačka region (upon liberation from the Turks) did not happen at the same time. Their arrival occurred from the beginning of the 15th to the end of the 17th century. Despite the long period of their being among other Pannonian peoples, the Bačka Croats have
survived and kept their speech patterns ("ikavian") as well as their wealth of costumes and art forms. This dance is done during wedding and other social gatherings. The bagpipe (gajde) used to be the traditional instrument played for this music; today the tambura orchestra is used. The dance was learned by Željko Jergan in 1989 from village group from Tavankut at Đakovački Vezovi Festival.

Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View pdf here.

Czardasz Śląski

Czardasz Śląski, or Silesian Csardas, is a dance from the region of Cieszyn (CHYEH-
shihn). Taking its influence form the Hungarian csardas it consists of 3 distinct
melodies with varying tempos. Various forms of the csardas are also found in several
other southern regions of Poland like Spisz (speesh) and Orawa (oh-RAH-vah). The
locals of each of these regions adapted the dance to their liking and the results are an
interesting blend of the two cultures. The czardasz from Cieszyn is no exception with
its slow tempos and fancy footwork to the quick and lively polka sections.

Presented by Richard Schmidt in 2008. View pdf here.

Darkeinu

This is a dance choreographed by Gadi Biton in 2002 to a song sung by Sarit Vino-Elad and Chani
Firstenberg.
Pronunciation:  dahr-KAY-noo  Translation: Our Path
Music:  4/4 meter  Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2011
Erica Goldman - Israeli Folk Dances CD, Track 3
Formation:  Circle facing CCW, hands held in V-position.
Steps & Styling:  Cha-cha-cross: Step R to R (ct 1); step L next to R (ct &); step R to R (ct 2); step L in front of R (ct 3); step back into place on R (ct 4). This step can be done with opp ftwk and
direction. Please also refer to “Steps Used in Israeli Dancing.”

Presented by Erica Goldman in 2011. View pdf here.

Danţ din Groşi

Many ethnographers and folklore specialists claim that couple dances originated in Scandinavia. Danţ din Groşi seems to be a perfect example in support of this theory. The dance’s two parts are clearly reminiscent of typical elements in Nordic dances, namely the promenade and the pivot turns. This dance from Maramureş, however, is distinct in that it is led by a particular couple who signals when to change figures and decides how long the dance
will last. The dancers liven up the dance by shouting (strigaturi) and whistling (fluierături), creating a festive, joyful atmosphere. Maramureş, in North-western Romania, is a focus of great interest to folklorists since traditions have survived in this region and continue to be preserved with utmost authenticity. Groşi is a commune located five kilometers southeast of Baia Mare, the capital of Maramureş. It is made up of three villages: Groşi, Ocoliş and Satu Nou De Jos. The locality of Groşi was certified in 1411, but its first inhabitants were there long before that. Legend has it that centuries ago, the area was covered by oak forests, the impressive trees having thick trunks. The forests served to shelter the inhabitants and hide them from barbarians. A 300-year-old oak tree stands at the entrance of the village of Groşi in honor of the ancient forests. A law to protect the tree is in force.

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2008. View pdf here.

Devochka Nadya – Девочка Надя

Traditional folk dance of the Don Cossacks that was collected by the Russian ethnomusicologist Aleksej Shilin during a field work expedition. Hennie Konings learned the dance from Aleksej Shilin at a dance event in the Ukraine in 2007. The melody of this dance is well known all over Russia and many different dances are done to it. Translation: “Nadya, little girl.”

Presented by Radboud Koop in 2008. View pdf here.

Di doi

Traveling across the Carpathian Mountains from west to east, then following the road through the Bicaz Gorges, one arrives in Cengăi (Csango) territory, that is, the area of Ghimeş-Făget. Some 5000 people make up this ethnic Catholic minority. Their history and identity are somewhat confusing since many contradictory theories about them exist, colored by nationalist ideals. Nonetheless, most specialists seem to agree that these are a people who
profess the Catholic religion, live in Moldavia, and originally came from Transylvania. The Csango have a rich folklore reflecting their make-up: half Hungarian, half Romanian. They speak a Hungarian dialect that even Hungarians find hard to understand. They wear costumes that are almost identical to the Romanian costumes found in the neighboring area. Their dances evoke the simplicity and energy of people who work the land. Di doi is how the standard Romanian de doi (deh doy) is pronounced in some areas of Moldavia. Di doi, which
means for two, is a dance in two parts. The chorus is done in a closed circle (Hora) and the figures are done as a couple dance. The same basic step is used throughout, to the particular rhythm of Quick-Slow-Quick-Slow-Slow. This step is found in two other dances from northern Muntenia (Breaza and Ungurica).

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2008. View pdf here.

Debarska Svadba

This dance is from the Debar area, in western Macedonia. It was done originally at weddings but now is done on other occasions, from weddings and birthdays to communal gatherings and religious holidays.
Pronunciation:  DEH-bahr-skah SVAHD-bah
Music:  7/8 meter, counted 1 2 3  Makedonski Narodni Pesni i Ora, Stockton
Folkdance Camp 2011, Band 14
Formation:  Mixed line or open circle, hands joined in W-position.
Steps & Styling: Čukče: A low hop in which the ball of the foot remains on the floor.

Presented by Fusae Senzaki-Carroll in 2011. View pdf here.

Debka Medabeket

A debka choreographed by Shmulik Gov-Ari in 1989. The lyrics were written by Ehud Manor and it is sung by the group Hadudaim.
Pronunciation:  DEHB-kah meh-dah-BEH-keht  Translation: Contagious Debka
Music:  4/4 meter  Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2011
Erica Goldman - Israeli Folk Dances CD, Track 4
Formation:  Open circle of dancers facing CCW, hands joined in V-position whenever possible.
Steps & Styling:  Sharp, clean and bouncy movements. Refer to “Steps Used in Israeli Dancing.”

Presented by Erica Goldman in 2011. View pdf here.

Deleormansko Vlaško

This is a Vlach dance from the Deleorman region in Northern Bulgaria or Severnjaško. Deleorman is an area which straddles the Bulgarian-Romanian border on both sides of the Danube River. The dance reflects influences from both countries in its style of performance, steps, and dance patterns. The dance was observed from local dance groups in Northern Bulgaria. During a joint teaching session in the Netherlands in 1979, the Romanian dance specialist Theodor Vasilescu heard this recording from the orchestra “Horo” from Russe, a town on the Bulgarian side of the Danube River. He spontaneously shared some additional material known in the Romanian part of the Deleorman region, which illustrates the dance similarities on both sides of the border.

Presented by Jaap Leegwater in 2011. View pdf here.

Derite (Se Čizme Moje)—not taught

During the 16th century Turkish invasion, many Croatians left the regions around the Kupa, Korana and Una rivers, and the region of Primorje, finding safety in a desolate region of Burgenland, Austria, known to the Croatians that live there as Gradišće. They have managed to maintain to this day, their rich traditions, language and culture, including this dance and song from the village Stinatz (Stinjaki), which are done during festive celebrations. The research was done in 1982-84 in Gradišće.

Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View pdf here.

 

Devichya khorovodnaya – Девичья хороводная

In 1955 Lidiya Bogotkova published the book Dances and Games for Students and Working Class
Youth. In this book she collected dances, songs and games based on folkloristic elements, although the music was often newly written. This dance is an adaptation by Hennie Konings of the version of the song that can be found in Bogotkova’s book. The music was written by A. Novikov and the text by O. Fadeyeva. The dance is a lyrical round dance for girls. It was first presented in Germany in 1993.

Presented by Radboud Koop in 2010. View pdf here.

Do Pasi

This dance comes from Veneto, in Verona and belongs to the group of dances called "Soti" - dances related to the German Schottische and widespread in the province of Verona and known throughout the entire region by various names. This tune is played by Calicanto, one of the most important bands in the Italian folk-revival movement, active since 1981.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Dobbelt Kvadrille

This dance is from Sønderborg in the Sønderjylland region of Denmark.
Pronunciation:  DUHB-behl kvah-DREEL-leh  Translation: Double Quadrille
Music:  2/4 meter  Liflig Sang CD 2, Track #6
Formation:  Ideally a Double Sicilian Circle with two cpls side by side facing two cpls, arranged as spokes on a wheel. If the group is small, make a line of two cpls facing two couples up and down the hall.

Presented by Wolfgang Schlüter in 2013. View pdf here.

Dobro Ljo

This dance is a variation on the popular Pravo Trakijsko Horo. It was learned from Leo Waudman.
Pronunciation:  doh-BROH lee-oh  Translation: Oh, Dobra (woman's name)
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 5
Formation:  Mixed lines. Hands joined down in V-pos or belt hold, L arm over R arm.
Steps & Styling: Knees bent slightly in an “earthy” style.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Dondokomonde moriagare

“Dondoko” is the onomatopoeic word for drumming, much like the English “ratta-tat-tat” or “rumpa-pa-pum”. “Moriagare” translates roughly as “Let’s have a Party!” This is a modern Japanese dance to modern music. It is done to a children’s song sung by a cartoon-like character who is a taiko drummer.

Presented by Iwao Tamaoki in 2012. View pdf here.

Drianovska Râčenica II

A line râčenica from the region of Drianovo in North-East Bulgaria. In 1998, Yves Moreau introduced a dance also called Drianovska Râčenica with different and slower music (a capella song), and therefore decided to call this one Drianovska Râčenica II, to avoid confusion. The version described below was introduced by Belčo Stanev in Germany to the popular folk song Trâgnali mi sa Drianovskite bulki.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

Drmeš iz Marijanaca

Slavonia is the richest agricultural region (known as the bread basket) in Croatia. For this reason, folk traditions have remained unchanged for centuries. The wealth of this region is reflected in the dances, songs and costumes. The village of Marijanci is in northeastern Slavonia (Osijek-Baranja County near the city of Valpovo). Most of the dances in Slavonia surround the musicians, who are in the center of a circle. Musical accompaniment features the bagpipe (gajde) and tambura (samica), or a full tambura orchestra. Slavonian people dance to celebrate any occasion - weddings, harvest, church celebrations, or any other daily occurrence that merits a celebration.

Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View pdf here.

El Bailecito

This is a graceful couple dance with the dancers apart and independent with a swaying movement. Throughout the choreography, the gentleman genteelly expresses his admiration for the woman with smooth and expressive movements of his handkerchief. The final approach and the coronation symbolize his success in wooing her. Because the dance’s name is also a generic word for short dances (Little Dance), there is sometimes confusion. El Gato is called “El Bailecito” in some parts of Argentina. Even so, this particular dance has its own history and specific choreography. It arrived in Argentina via Bolivia, entering in the northwest of the country in the middle of the 18th century. It spread to the provinces of Catamarca, Tucumán, Santiago del Estero, and Córdoba. Its origins are obscure but it is supposed that it is from one of the dances brought by Spain to the New World in the colonial years.

Presented by Pampa Cortés in 2013. View pdf here.

El Chamamé

Chamamé is a baile popular, a social dance, and is not considered to be one of the folkloric dances of Argentina. It is a couple dance with a closed embrace. There is no set choreography. The man improvises according to his taste, both with dance steps and Zapateo (see end of this section of instructions on Zapateos). Chamamé is a fusion of many roots including the indigenous Guaraní, the baroque music of the Jesuit monks who arrived to the area in the 1600s, African rhythms of freed slaves from Brazil and then, in the 1800s, the European immigrants such as the Ukrainians, Italians, Germans, Russians, and Basques who brought their polkas and schottische, and the accordion – the instrument most associated with the genre. Chamamé has its deepest roots in the northeastern part of Argentina called the Litoral, the land close to the rivers (in between Uruguay and Paraná rivers). The town of Yapeyú is considered the birthplace of chamamé music. There the monks and the Guaraní built the largest instrument factory in all of Latin America. The music and dance were disdained by the middle and upper classes as music for country folk. It wasn’t until the 1980s that the music became a vehicle for social commentary and embraced by more of the population.

Presented by Pampa Cortés in 2013. View pdf here.

El Cuando

This beautiful courtly dance was danced in the first half of the 1800s throughout Argentina with the exception of Buenos Aires and el Litoral region. It is a derivation of the Gavotas that the Spanish brought to Argentina in the 18th century. These were French dances composed of two melodies – the Minuet and the other is what became El Gato. The Argentine military hero San Martin possibly first saw it in Mendoza and then took it to Chile on a military campaign along with other dances in 1817. It is a historical dance that is typically only performed in programs celebrating national days. The women wear long ball gowns with mantillas and combs and the men are dressed in tails.

Presented by Pampa Cortés in 2013. View pdf here.

El Gato

This lively creole dance is found throughout Argentina. It is possible that it arrived by the 1820s from Peru via Bolivia or Chile or perhaps both. It was also danced in Uruguay, Paraguay, Chile and Peru, though it is in Argentina that it had the strongest development and diffusion. Originally it was known by different names in various provinces and there are still some places where it is called “Bailecito,” which is now the name of a completely different dance. Suffice it to say that El Gato is what this dance is called in the majority of Argentina. There are several variations, including El Gato Cuyano, Gato Con Relaciones (couplets), Gato Polqueado (polka), Gato Encadenado (enlaced), and Gato Patriótico (danced with two couples and with handkerchiefs). El Gato uses a rhythm that is “ternario” – a measure of three parts (triplets) in 6/8 time, with the bass or drum percussion in 3/4 time.

Presented by Pampa Cortés in 2013. View pdf here.

 

El Remedio

El Remedio is a happy, lively dance of gallantry where the man and woman dance apart until the very end. It is generally danced with handkerchiefs waving overhead and dipping in salute. In the choreo-graphy, the man celebrates the woman and makes her the object of his attention, chasing her through the four corners and turns, showing off for her his best efforts in the Zapateo, hoping to win her admiration. The handkerchief plays a part in this dance and is important in the courtship as the dancers can express through its movements how they feel.

Presented by Pampa Cortés in 2013. View pdf here.

Etchu Ohara

Yatsuo is in the present-day Toyama prefecture (once known as Etchu prefecture) and is the hometown of this particular dance. It is a quiet place surrounded by mountains and water, and is famous for its silk-worm farming. The township goes back as far as 1636. The song was sung by young female workers during the thread-extracting process and was introduced at a Bon festival in July of 1702. This town had a rather a showy culture because, during the season, many of the woman worked at silk factories away from home and earned well. The women also brought back customs not found locally. From 1874 to 1885, the Owara festival was banned because it was considered an affront to good taste and the nights of sleep. In 1922, the Owara-Study Group was formed by people who loved and supported the festival. The group grew into the Toyama Minyoh (folk music) Preservation Society and, with their help, the Owara festival grew to become as big as it is today. During the festival, dancers wear concealing, low-
brimmed straw hats while dancing day and night. Lyrics to the songs then and now are written by famous poets, writers or by average citizens by open invitation. The preservation society tries to keep the original song’s simple but elegant singing style intact and has banned members from participating in any type of singing contests, and singing at other public events as well as by limiting and keeping the musical instruments to the original three.

Presented by Iwao Tamaoki in 2012. View pdf here.

E Vamos à Luta

This samba was choreographed by Lucia Cordeiro in 2010 to music by Gonzaguinha (CD “De Volta ao Começo”). The composer is the son of Luiz Gonzaga, a popular Brazilian composer of the last century. Born in the city of Rio de Janeiro, he wrote some of the best songs in the Brazilian repertoire. This is one of his classics. The title of the song and the dance literally means “We will fight” but might better be translated as “Let’s Go For It!” It honors the Brazilian youth that has faith and works hard, even under difficult conditions. It is a hymn to the Brazilian spirit of joy of living and hope.

Presented by Lucia Cordeiro in 2013. View pdf here.

Falsa Moneda

Dance from Mike de Keizer. Falsa Moneda means “Fake Money.” It is a flamenco song from Spain that has been sung by many artists. This recording is by José Feliciano.
Pronunciation:  FAHL-sah moh-NAY-dah
Music:  4/4 meter  Ethnic Festival 2011 CD, Track 3
Formation:  Couples in a closed circle, ballroom hold, man with back to ctr. Steps of the woman are described; man does opp ftwk.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2011. View pdf here.

Festa do Interior

This dance was choreographed by Lucia Cordeiro in 2013. The music was composed by Abel Silva and Moraes Moreira, and this recording features the singing of Gal Costa, considered to be one of the best voices in Brazilian music. The rhythm is frevo, a street dance very popular in the state of Pernambuco, in the northeastern part of Brazil. Frevo means “boiling” in Portuguese and refers to the fast, intricate steps performed by the dancers. The dance has its roots in the Capoeira playing in front of the military band parades in the past. Some people believe this dance form was influenced by Russian dancers in Recife, the capital of Pernambuco, during the past century, as you see in some acrobatic movements. In fact there are more than 100 different steps. It all depends on each dancer’s skill and creative improvisation.

Presented by Lucia Cordeiro in 2013. View pdf here.

Flor Amorosa

Flor Amorosa is a chorinho or blues song full of Brazilian emotion and wit. The choreographer is
Cristiana Menezes (2003).
Pronunciation:  flohr ah-moh-ROH-sah  Meaning: Flower of Affection
Music:  2/4 meter  Brazilian Soul , Track 5
Formation:  Dancers facing ctr of circle. Hands can remain free and moving freely, or may be joined in V-pos.

Presented by Lucia Cordeiro in 2012. View pdf here.

Fourlana

This dance is from the Ionian Sea island of Corfu. The dance originated in the Italian city of Firuli.
Islands in the Ionian Sea often have strong Italian cultural influences. Although not strictly necessary in the traditional form, dancers in Corfu today tend to follow a specific choreography. The dance is particularly happy and is a well-loved dance on Corfu.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

Francøs Kontra

This dance is from Stevning in the Sønderjylland region of Denmark.
Pronunciation: frahn-SOOS kahn-trah  Translation: Dance in French style
Music:  2/4 meter  Liflig Sang CD 2, Track #10
Formation:  Any number of couples in a big circle, hands joined in V-pos. All start with left. After the first time through the music, a designated leader (or leaders) calls variations to replace Fig I.

Presented by Wolfgang Schlüter in 2013. View pdf here.

Galoppa

This dance comes from Emilia-Romagna and has a relatively recent origin. Galoppa appeared for the first time in the first half of 19th century as a variation to the polka, called Gallop. Today it can be found in the region of Bologna in the valleys Savena and Reno.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Gau Shan Ching ( 高山青)

The song “High Green Mountain” was written in 1949, the collaborative work of the famous poet Yu-Ping Deng as its lyricist, and Lan-Ping Jou as the composer. It is the theme song of the movie “The Magnificent Happenings on Mt. Ali, directed by Cheh Chang. The movie may be long forgotten, but the song “High Green Mountain” has spread all over the world and become a representation of Taiwan. It is also a song with which all Taiwanese are familiar. Based on the steps of the aborigines, the main ideas of the lyrics describe the beauty of the young ladies and the strength of the young men who are the aborigines on Mt. Ali. They are the Tzou tribe. This dance was choreographed by Chang-Shiung Yang in June 1989.

Presented by Fang-Chich Chen in 2010. View pdf here.

Ginka

This is a dance performed to the popular Pirin Macedonian song “Mitro le, Mitro” (Southwest Bulgaria). When performed by men only, this dance is danced with high jumps. The dance pattern includes 1 figure.
Pronunciation:  GIHN-kah
Music:  From Bulgaria and Beyond CD, Band 6.  7/8 meter (SQQ)
Formation:  Open circle; hands joined in V-pos, facing LOD.

Presented by Daniela Ivanova in 2008. View pdf here.

Giga

This is a dance from Emilia-Romagna. Like the Piedmontese Gigo, the Giga from Emilia is a widely
spread, popular dance in 6/8 rhythm. It is danced in couples, and belongs to the group called “Balli Staccati” (without touching) of the Bologna Mountains (Valle del Savena, Valle del Setta).

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Glava li ta boli

A variation of the Pravo Horo from the Rhodopes (Pravo Rodopsko) on a popular song interpreted by Nadežda
Hvojneva. Learned from Belo Stanev, Germany, 1999.
Pronunciation: GLAH-vah lee tah BOH-lee
Music: Yves Moreau CD YM-UOP-07, track 10 3/4 meter
Formation: Open circle. Face slightly R of ctr. Wt on L. Hands in W-pos.
Styling: Calm and proud

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2007. View pdf here.

Glaviniška Kopanica

This Kopanica belongs to a group of well known Kopanici from western Bulgaria. Others in this family include: Lamba Lamba, Plovdiska Kopanica, Ludo Kopano, Bistrička Kopanica, et.al. Kotansky based the steps below on several versions of this dance learned over the past 35 years from Stefan Vaglarov, Georgi Kinski, Belčo Stanev, and others.

Presented by Stephen Kotansky in 2010. View pdf here.

Góralski

This is a modern dance based on the folklore of the Tatra Mountains of Poland. The Górale (Mountain Folk) of Poland have a unique style and dialect of their own. To this day when traveling through this region, you will find the local people dressed in elements of the traditional costume. The young people continue the traditions and customs of their ancestors by taking their lyrics and melodies and adapting them to modern instruments. While you can find modern adaptions in other part of the country, the Górale ones have a special beat of their own. I usually don’t teach mountain dances in folk camps due to their intricate footwork and the uniqueness of the music, which at times can be quite repetitious and hard to listen to;
however, I believe that this modern version will be a blast of fresh air and will give dancers a taste of this special folklore. Although modern, the styling is still taken from the mountain regions of Poland, where men are proud and stand tall, yet the mountainous terrain often causes them to lean forward so as to keep their balance. They also wear wide heavy leather belts that give them stiff support around their midriff. Women may be used to hard work (indeed!), but they are very light on their feet.

Presented by Richard Schmidt in 2012. View pdf here.

Gujou Odori Harukoma

The "Gujo Odori” festival is one of the three most famous traditional dance festivals in Japan. The town of Gujo-hachiman (Hachiman is a town in the center of Gujo district in Gifu prefecture) is surrounded by mountains and the Yoshida River. There is no other town where folk music is so popular. From early July to early September, there are many folklore events almost every night. Especially at Obon festival (a traditional summer festival in which the Japanese honor their ancestors) from August 13-16, the people dance all night. The sight of more than 20,000 people dancing together in a trancelike state is a real thrill of folklore.
The people of this region have a special love for horses, and the lords encouraged horsemanship and horse trading among its population. The tradition is still alive today. This dance mimics the movement of horses while riding.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=07U3rUadS7Y
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=5Yp47zd_NGQ

Presented by Iwao Tamaoki in 2012. View pdf here.

Gülbeyaz

Gülbeyaz means “White Rose” and is also a girl’s name. It is from the Black Sea area.
Pronunciation: GYOOL-beh-YAHZ
CD: Ahmet Lüleci Turkish Dances, Band 5. 4/4 Meter
Formation: Arms bent from the elbows, forearms touching neighbor’s forearms, hands slightly lower than the elbows. This is known as “Black Sea Position.”

Presented by Ahmet Lüleci in 2007. View pdf here.

Gulli

The name translates as “the one with the rose.” It is used as a female name.

Pronunciation: gool-LIH

Music: Ahmet Lüleci Turkish Dances, Band 2

Formation: Semi-circle, V-pos, hands R under, L over, facing center.

Styling: Flat-footed, but bouncy.

Described and presented by Ahmet Lüleci in 2007. View pdf here.

Gypsy Polka Mixer

This is an easy polka mixer choreographed by Richard Powers and based on John Filcich’s much longer (48 bar) Tamburitza Polka, presented at Stockton in 1954. The name affectionately refers to the 1950s when many high-energy folk dances were whimsically called “Gypsy.”

Presented by Richard Powers in 2011. View pdf here.

Hambo

The hambo is one of the folk dances of Sweden that quite possibly derived along some of the same lines as the mazurka and polska (Sjöberg 1980). In both the polska and hambo the dancers make a full clockwise one-measure turn, starting on the same foot at the beginning of each measure. The late Gordon Tracie referred to the hambo as "the national dance of Sweden" (Lidster & Tamburini 1965). It is perhaps the most well known of the folk dances in Sweden, with Swedish cultural groups around the world, and with American folk dancers.
The hambo has been danced continuously for at least the last hundred years. It is basically the same dance throughout Sweden, yet one can see regional as well as individual characteristics.
In 1965 the province/cultural area of Hälsingland began an annual hambo competition in early July. The competition has influenced the style of the hambo. It has provided a lot of visibility for the dance, and for many years 1500 couples participated. There was a race to the postbox to apply for the event. The event still exists today though it has changed some and is not as popular as it once was. There are hambo competitions in a number of areas in Sweden today.
The hambo style described here is as one might find in the Hälsingehambon contest. It is based on what I have learned from Tommy and Ewa Englund, Stig and Helén Eriksson, Leif and Margareta Virtanen, who have all won the competition at least once, dance researcher-teacher Bo Peterzon, and from the late Gordon Tracie.

Presented by Roo Lester in 2009. View pdf here.

Harmanlijska Râčenica

Line râčenica from the region around Harmanli in Eastern Thrace. Observed by Yves Moreau at folk festival in Haskovo, June 1966. Dance can be done to any basic 8-meas Thracian râčenica tune.
Translation: Râčenica from the region of Harmanli.

Pronunciation: hahr-mahn-LEE-skah ruh-che-NEE-tsah

Music: 7/8 meter (QQS) CD: Yves Moreau Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2009, Band 4.

Formation: Mixed open circle. Hands in W-pos. Wt on L, face ctr.

Styling: Earthy, slight knee bend.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

 

Haste to the Wedding

This is a traditional contra. The music is from the operetta The Elopement (1767). This tune, known variously as “Haste to the Wedding,” “Come Haste,” “Rural Felicity” and even “The Rules of Felicity,” has had dozens of sets of dance directions paired with it. The set chosen here seems to fit the music best of them all. The tune appeared in America first in Aaron Thompson MS, 1777. Difficulty level: Easy.

Presented by Jerry Helt in 2010. View pdf here.

Heyamo

Laz work song from the Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey. Heyamo was collected and arranged by Birol Topaloglu, translated by Brenna MacCrimmon. Birol is a Turkish Laz musician. The Laz people are a minority group who live in the mountainous regions of eastern Turkey around the Black Sea. Their language is related to Mingrelian Georgian. It is very unusual to find harmonized songs in Turkey and the harmony in this tune is very much a part of the Georgian influence in their culture. As the borders were drawn up between Turkey andthe Soviet Union, the planners used natural boundaries like rivers and mountains to establish their lines. Some of these went straight through communities. Because of the tensions between the two countries it became impossible to carryon daily life on both sides of a river. To visit relatives on the Turkish side, for example, Soviet-siders would first have totravel to Moscow, then Istanbul and Ankara, and finally on an uncomfortable overland journey, a total of thousands of miles—justto reach a destination that was in effect a stone’s throw away—or risk being shot at by border guards. The villagers used songs to communicate what was happening on their side of the border, letting the other side knowwho was getting married, how the harvest was going, and so on. The songs were sent freely from one side of the valley to the other because their language was unknown to most soldiers posted atthe watch points.

Described and presented by Ahmet Lüleci in 2007. View pdf here.

Hai zelenenky – Гай зэлэнэнький

This dance is set to a traditional Kuban Cossack humorous dance song. The dance was choreographed by Hennie Konings based on traditional Kuban Cossack folk dance material. First presented in Germany in 1996.
Translation: “Green forest,” from the first line of the accompanying song.
Pronunciation:  hai zeh-leh-NEHN-kee
Music:  Russian Folk Dances @ Stockton 2008, Band 3.  2/4 meter
or SYNCOOP 5758 CD 229, Band 2.
Formation:  Circle, no hand hold. Begin facing ctr.
Steps & Styling: All stamps are without weight unless otherwise noted.

Presented by Radboud Koop in 2008. View pdf here.

Hora lui Şerban

The most popular and widespread dances in Romania are known as Hore (plural of Hora). They are found everywhere in the country, although they take on different forms. Sometimes they’re danced only by men, only by women, or by both; sometimes the circle moves clockwise, sometimes counter-clockwise; and so on. The Hore from Banat are danced in an open circle and are led by the first dancer. The leader decides and signals when to change sequences.
Romanians are jovial and enjoy a good joke. They love to party and will find many pretexts to celebrate, to get together with friends and have a good meal, drink, sing and, it goes without saying, dance. At present, wedding celebrations lasting more than three days are unfortunately almost a thing of the past (except in a few villages where everyone pitches in to make the event a memorable one), and the opportunities to invite a band to play at a festivity are becoming rare. However, music is still ever-present in the more economical form of hiring a disc jockey for the night. Contemporary popular musicians and singers are heavily influenced by western countries and electronic instruments abound. Thus rhythms and arrangements have taken on a more modern air, although many have retained the flavor and sound of traditional Romanian music. Now it’s not unusual to see Romanians spontaneously dance their traditional steps to the music of the day. Hora lui Şerban is an excellent example of this new form of urban folklore.

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2008. View pdf here.

Hora şchioapă

Hora, plural Hore (same reading as Greek Horae), is the name of an ancient circular dance, which survived up to now days in Romania. In the ancient times, naked women danced it. In Romania three clay depictions were found of this dance, two of them having five dancers and one with six dancers. The last one, which is the most famous, was found at Bodesti-Frumusica, in Moldavia. All of them are dating from 4000–3000 BC. The word şchioapă means limping and this dance is a great example of very old Hore.

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2008. View pdf here.

Hopa dina

Moslavina is situated at the foot of the Moslavina Hill, at the apex of many rivers, lakes and swamps. This region is renowned for its wine and agricultural wealth. For this reason the national costume, songs and dances have been developed to the highest level and have been carried on from generation to generation to the present day. Željko was researching in Popovača, Kutina and Gradečki Pavlovec (parts of Moslavina region) 1977-1985.

Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View pdf here.

Hora Din Moldova

This is a dance in the Moldovan style choreographed by Roberto Bagnoli. The song is sung by
Moldovan singer Nelly Ciobanu and was the Moldovan entry in the Eurovision Song Contest 2009.
Pronunciation:  HOH-rah DEEN mohl-DOH-vah
Music:  2/4 meter  Ethnic Festival 2011 CD, Track 2
Formation:  Mixed circle, facing center, hands held in V-position.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2011. View pdf here.

Hora nevestelor

This dance comes from the village of Roia de Seca, in the county of Alba, in central Transylvania. Alba borders on the north with the countyofClujand on the southwiththat ofSibiu.It covers 6231 km, that is,2.6 percent of the total area of Romania. The capital city is Alba-Iulia (73,000 inhabitants) and was, for a period in the past, the national capital.
Hora nevestelor din Roia de Seca belongs to the category of women’s dances generally referred to as Purtata fetelor. These dances are known by different names, however, depending on where they are danced. For example, in the villages of Cpâlna and Feisa, it is called Purtata; in the village of Crciunel, it is known as Btut and in Roia de Seca, Hora nevestelor, as mentioned. The term neveste means “married women.” Thus in Roia de Seca, traditionally, only married women did the dance. Originally the song was sung a cappella. Nowadays one or two musicians from the local area accompany the dancers.

Presented by Sonia Dion and Cristian Florescu in 2007. View pdf here.

Hora nuntaºilor

The word nuntaºilor¸ means wedding guests. Whether in western Romania (Banat) or any other region in the country, marriage is a commitment that still today is an important stage in people’s lives. Marriage is synonymous with a multitude of rituals and customs, which vary from region to region, but everywhere weddings are always celebrated with a lot of spirit and given much importance. Due to the significance of the event, everyone prepares for it long in advance.

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2007. View pdf here.

Hora pojorenilor

Hora (plural Hore; same as Greek Horae), is the name of an ancient circule dance which has
survived up to today in Romania. In the ancient times, naked women danced it. In Romania three
clay depictions of this dance were found, two of them showing five dancers and one showing six
dancers. The last one, the most famous, was found at Bodesti-Frumusica in Moldavia. All of them
date from 4000–3000 B.C. The village of Pojorâta is in the region of Bucovina, at the foot on Mount Raru, in the department (judeţul in Romanian) of Suceava. The village, seven kilometers west of the city of Câmpulung Moldovenesc, stretches along a valley of beautiful landscapes.

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2010. View pdf here.

Hora din Giurgiuleşti

Hora din Giurgiuleşti is from the village of Giurgiuleşti in southern Moldova. Hora is a national dance that requires a relatively large group of people to hold hands and form a circle. There can be several circles one inside of the other, all moving in opposite directions. This dance was choreographed by George and Irina Arabagi.

Presented by George & Irina Arabagi in 2012. View pdf here.

Hora veche

Pronunciation:  HOH-rah VEH-keh
Music:  4/4 meter  Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu Romanian
Realm, Vol. 6, Track 9
Formation:  Mixed closed circle, body facing slightly diagonally to the right, hands joined in
W-pos. Joined hands make small, delicate circular motions throughout the dance.
Meas  4/4 meter  Pattern

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2012. View pdf here.

Hozanki

This is a Kurdish-style dance from southeastern Turkey, in the Halay style.
Pronunciation:  Hoh-ZAHN-kee
Music:  4/4 meter  Ahmet Lüleci Stockton 2010, Band 16
Formation:  Semi-circle, facing ctr, moving CCW, little fingers joined in V-pos.

Presented by Ahmet Lüleci in 2010. View pdf here.

Huan-Leh Ko (歡樂歌)

This is an aboriginal folk song from Eastern Taiwan in Taitung County. This dance was choreographed by Ching-Shan Chang in 1981.
Translation:  Happy Song
Pronunciation:  HWAHN-luh KUH
Music:  2/4 meter Folk Dances from Taiwan–Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2010, Band 1
Formation:  Open circle or mixed line, in front basket hold (L hand over R hand); or joined hands in V-pos.

Presented by Fang-Chich Chen in 2010. View pdf here.

 

Hutsulka - Гуцулка

Hutsulka is a popular Ukrainian folk dance from southwestern Ukraine. This dance has been a very
common participatory dance in villages in western Ukraine, from at least the 19th century to today. Hutsulka is related to kolomyika-type dances. There are many different variants of hutsulka in many different villages. All of them are typically danced in circles that break down into smaller circles and couples, circling to fast-paced music. The name of the dance refers to a girl form the province (oblast) of Hutsulshina. This dance was choreographed by George and Irina Arabagi.

Presented by George & Irina Arabagi in 2012. View pdf here.

I Am Hawai’i

A fun Hula that Hilde Otterholt learned from Kumu Blain Kamalani Kia. This song was written in 1966 for the film Hawai’i. Lyrics are by Mack David, and music is by Elmer Bernstein.
Pronunciation:  I Am Hawai’i
Music:  4/4 meter Moea by Blaine Kamalani Kia, Band 20
Formation:  Individually in lines, with arms-length distance between each dancer. All face the same direction.

Presented by Hilde P. Otterholt 2010. View pdf here.

Ihtimanska Kopanica

This is a women’s Kopanica from lhtiman, Šop region (Western Bulgaria). The word “Kopaníca” is
derived from the verb “Kopaja” (“to dig”). In dance and music terminology, Kopaníca means a dance in 11/8 meter (2-2-3-2-2) and it is also the name of its basic step.
Pronunciation:  ee-tee-MAHN-skah KOP-ah-nee-tsah
Music:  11/8 meter  Bulgarian Folk Dances with Jaap Leegwater, counted as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Stockton Edition, Track 6
Formation:  Open circle. Hands belt hold, R arm under, L arm over.

Presented by Jaap Leegwater in 2011. View pd here.

Încâlcita

The Romanian word încâlcita means confusing or unclear. In popular music it refers to a bit of cleverness by musicians (lautari) to surprise both listeners and dancers. The music begins with an introduction in 3/4 time, leading everyone to believe it’s a waltz. On the fifth measure, however, the musician turns the rhythm into a 4/4, throwing the disconcerted dancers into a muddle.
Încâlcita in Moldavia, Floricica in Oltenia and Brâuleţul in Muntenia are examples of dances requiring considerable skill and agility. The steps are fast, small and precise, enhanced with many crossing movements forward and back. They are done on the ball of the foot or the heel, in syncopated rhythms.

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2008. View pdf here.

Ijswals

Ijswals was written down by Mrs. A. Sanson-Catz in 1925 as one of the traditional dances of the
Netherlands. The music originally was called “Oude Passepie” and was performed in the theater in Amsterdam from 1696 to 1716. The dance reflects the skating of couples on ice. This dance was originally presented at Stockton Folk Dance Camp in 1984 by Jaap Leegwater. In 1996, Tineke Van Geel also presented the dance to a different version of the music that has a much longer introduction.

Presented by Bruce Mitchell in 2012. View pdf here.

Ikariotikos from Ikaria

Ikaria is an island in the east Aegean Sea. It derives its name from Icarus, the son of Daedalus who, according to Greek mythology, fell into the sea nearby. Τoday, Icaria is considered one of the world's five “Blue Zones” – places where the population regularly lives to an advanced age (one in three make it to their 90s). This is due to healthy diets and lifestyle.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

Ilumina

This dance was choreographed by Lucia Cordeiro in 2013 to a song by Noca da Portela, Tranka and Toninho do Nascimento from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The singer is Maria Bethania, a favorite Brazilian artists. The lyrics are a prayer to the Divine Lady.

Presented by Lucia Cordeiro in 2013. View pdf here.

I’m Busted

An easy 4-wall line dance choreographed by Jerry and Kathy Helt.
Music:  2/4 meter  BLUE STAR RECORD, 2219-B or any fun,
jazzy music with a 2/4 rhythm
Formation:  Individuals dancing in lines all facing the same direction. Begin facing the front of the hall.

Presented by Jerry and Kathy Helt in 2013. View pdf here.

Iyono Matsuyama Tsuzumi Odori

This dance has traditionally been performed at the Matsuyama Summer Festival, one of Shikoku’s largest festivals. “Iyono Matsuyama Tsuzumi Odori” has been deeply influenced by Noh, a formal theater art popular among the residents of Mastuyama. It traditionally was danced with a tsuzumi, a two-headed drum used in Noh. Recently, however, it was musically rearranged in the style of the Cuban dance, the mambo! This reinvention eventually became the Yakyu-ken Odori and Yakyu Samba, both of which are now popular at the Matsuyama Summer Festival in place of the traditional “Iyono Matsuyama Tsuzumi Odori.” [See full map of Japan at the beginning of this
section for location of this island.]

Presented by Iwao Tamaoki in 2012. View pdf here.

Jabuke - Marice

Baranja is an area which straddles the border between northeastern Croatia and southwestern Hungary. Croatians (Bošnjaci & Šokci), who have lived there for many generations, inhabit the villages in Hungary near the town of Pécs (Pećuh). Their dances retain their Slavic character, with little or no influence from the surrounding Hungarian culture. The folk songs, music, costumes and dance are today only celebrated during family gatherings, church celebrations or weddings, thanks to the village elders. Željko was researching around the city of Pécs in the summer of 1992.

Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View pdf here.

Jiffy Mixer

Dance composed by Jerry and Kathy Helt.

Music:     Windsor No.4684, Music by the Pete Lofthouse Band.

Formation:      Cpis in Butterfly pos. M's back twd ctr of hall. Steps are described for the M, W dances opp ftwk.

Presenter not given, presented in 2013. View pdf here.

Joc în trei

This dance is from the mountains in Banat, Romania. It consists of two dances:  Brâul and De doi.
Pronunciation:  ZHOHK yoon TREH-EE
Music:  7/16 meter, 2/4 meter  Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu Romanian Realm Vol. 6, Track 11
Rhythm:  First dance: 7/16 counted 1-2-3 1-2 1-2 or 1-2-3 or SQQ. Second dance: 2/4
Formation:  Scattered threesome sets (two women and one man in small closed circles) facing
center. Hands joined in V-pos.

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2012. View pdf here.

Joc Mare

This dance is a traditional Moldavian dance where the dancers hold hands in a circle. Joc Mare is
popular during wedding celebrations and festivals, and is an essential part of the social entertainment in rural areas. This dance was choreographed by George and Irina Arabagi.

Presented by George & Irina Arabagi in 2012. View pdf here.

Jota Revolvedera

This is a dance from the town of Caceres, in the Extremadura region in southwestern Spain. Roberto learned it from Daniel Peces. “Jota” means “turning.”
Pronunciation:  HOH-tah RAY-vohl-vee-DEH-rah
Music:  6/8 meter  Ethnic Festival 2011 CD, Track 4
Formation:  Couples in a long-ways set.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2011. View pdf here.

Kagoshima Ohara Bushi

The song is called simply “Ohara Bushi” by the locals but “Kagoshima” is added to differentiate it from other Owara songs such as “Etchu Owara Bushi” and “Tsugaru Ohara Bushi.” The origin of the song is “Yassa Bushi,” which was sung by samurais in Yasuhisa on the front lines during battles. In the Taisho Era (1912-26), a Geisha named Ippachi made this song
popular throughout the local Geisha community. Another Geisha, Kiyomi, recorded it around 1933 and it became quite popular all over Japan. At that time, a dance was choreographed for Geisha performance. The origin of the dance is unknown, but we do know it changed from an energetic, morale-boosting, battlefront song to a labor song sung during soil compacting to lay the foundation for buildings. The dance movements, opening hands from partially clenched fist, as well as the subtle kick steps, are mimicking the pulling and releasing of the rope to compact soil, and removing dirt from clothing. As a part of the preservation, this particular version is certified as the city’s official dance by Kagoshima City’s Department of Tourism and folklore division.

Presented by Iwao Tamaoki in 2012. View pdf here.

Kak na taluyu na zemlyu – Как на талую на землю

The title of this dance is taken from the first line of the accompanying song, meaning “As it happened, on the thawed earth.” It is a traditional dance song from the Ural region. The dance, a so-called parnaya plyaska (plyaska meaning “dance,” and parnaya “in couples”) was choreographed by Hennie Konings and is an example of basic elements of the Russian folk dance school. It was first presented in Langnau, Switzerland, in 2010. The typical “walking steps over the heel” during meas 1-2 of Figure I are thought to originate from the city quadrille dancing, where town folks wearing modern heeled shoes liked to focus the attention to this piece of contemporary costume, making full use of the possibilities these shoes with heels were giving over old-fashioned leather sandals. Tatyana Ustinova, former choreographer of the Pyatnitskiy Folk Ensemble, developed an academic style of staged folk dancing, and she often made use of this particular step.

Presented by Radboud Koop in 2010. View pdf here.

Kaladzoj

This dance is from Kosovo and is still danced by Albanian people in Kosovo on many different
occasions.
Pronunciation:  KAH-lah-djoy
Music:  12/16 meter, counted 1 2 3 4 Makedonski Narodni Pesni i Ora, Stockton Folkdance Camp 2011, Band 3
Formation:  Mixed line or open circle, hands joined in W-position.

Presented by Fusae Senzaki-Carroll in 2011. View pdf here.

Kapetan Vojvoda

This is a type of Pravo Horo in ten measures that is danced to a popular folk song about Kapetan
Vojvoda, a man whose real name was Kostadin Nunkov, who fought the Ottoman Turks in the region of Blagoevgrad.
Pronunciation:  kah-peh-TAHN voy-VOH-dah  Translation: the captain, the leader
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 1
Formation:  Mixed lines. Hands in W-pos. Face R of ctr (LOD), wt on L ft.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Kardamska Zborenka

Zborenka is a common type of dance throughout Dobrudža in North-East Bulgaria. This version is from the region of Kardam near the Romanian border. Learned from Živko Petrov.
Pronunciation: Kahr-DAHM-skah ZBOH-rehn-kah
Music:2/4 meter CD:  Yves Moreau Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2009, Band 8.
Formation: Mixed open circle or line. Face ctr, wt on L. Hands joined down at sides, V-pos, or short lines in front basket hold.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

Kavodoritikos

This dance is from the Aegean Sea island of Evia in Greece and is a typical island-style syrtos dance with a couple dance variation included.
Pronunciation:  Kah-voh-doh-REE-tee-kohs  Translation: See the end of this dance description
Music:  2/4 meter  Timeless Sounds, Track 6
Formation:  Open circle, leader on R, front basket, L over R.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

 

Kcim

This is a solo dance which can also be perfomed as a solo, duet, or in group form. It incorporates
movements out of everyday life in an aesthetically altered way. Learned from Janet Reineck, Dancers of Ensemble Shota, Kosovar Albanians. The title means “jumpy.”
Pronunciation: KTSEEM
Music:  2/4  Balkan I 2010 Steve’s Dances CD, Band 18 Balkan II 2010 Alternates CD, Band 10
Formation:  Open circle hands joined in W-pos. Arms bounce up on ct 1 and down on ct 2. There
can be a slight movement of the hips.

Presented by Stephen Kotansky in 2010. View pdf here.

Kerekes

The name of this dance is derived from the word “kerek” meaning round. This is one of a grouping of dances from Gyimes collectively known as the “Aprók” (little) dances. This kind of archaic circle dance can no longer be found in most of the regions where Hungarians live. Opinion differs as to whether it exists in Gyimes because the Csángo people learned these dances from neighboring Romanians or whether they kept this earlier style of dancing. In other Hungarian regions, this dance style was lost when the wave of couple dances arrived. The archival footage we used to recreate this dance was collected in 1980 in Gyimes by Gyorgy Martin, et al.

Presented by Dénes Dreisziger and Gissella Santayana in 2010. View pdf here.

Ketsueki Gattagata

The word “Ketsueki” translates as “blood” and “Ketsueki Gata” as “blood type.” “Gattagata” means “not coordinated, or not organized.” See notes about the song under Lyrics.
Pronunciation:  keht-soo-eh-kee gah-tah-gah-tah
Music:  4/4 meter  Japanese Music CD, Track 11
Formation:  Individuals in a circle dancing freely, arms bent at the elbow, hands in loose
fists held at waist height.

Presented by Iwao Tamaoki in 2012. View pdf here.

Kievskii Hopak – КиеЬский Гопак

This dance is from the vicinity of Kiev in the central region of Ukraine. Hopak is the most famous and well-known dance form in the Ukrainian culture. This dance was choreographed by George and Irina Arabagi.
Pronunciation:  Kee-EFF-skee hoh-PAHK
Music:  2/4 meter  Ukrainian Dance Workshop, Track 9
Formation:  Couples in a circle facing CCW. M’s L arm supports W’s L arm extended in front. M’s R hand on W’s waist at the R. W’s R hand is on R hip, fingers fwd.

Presented by George & Irina Arabagi in 2012. View pdf here.

Kiladiotiko

Kiladiotiko is a dance from the town of Kilada, about 40 miles SE of Nafplion, in NE Peloponnese. I learned this dance from the local folk dance group in Nafplion. Oddly enough it is often danced to Island-style syrtó music, often from Naxos.

Pronunciation: KIHL-ah-dee-AW-tee-koh

Music: 4/4 meter CD: Balkan and Beyond – Stockton 2009, Band 4.
Formation: Line of dancers, leader on R, high W-pos

Presented by Lee Otterholt in 2009. View pdf here.

Kırikcan

Kırikcan means “Broken soul/Hurting soul.” The dance comes from Gaziantep (southeast of Anatolia) and is in the Halay style.
Pronunciation: KUH-reek-dzhahn
Music:  Mixed meter  Ahmet Lüleci Stockton 2010, Band 7
Part 1 is 4/4, Part 2 is 10/4
Formation:  Semi circle. Handhold is R arm behind L, fingers locked together. Elbows are bent
so forearms are parallel to the ground, but tucked back between bodies.

Presented by Ahmet Lüleci in 2010. View pdf here.

Kaczor from Kurpie

Kaczor is from the Green Kurpie Region of Poland located in the East Central part of Poland.
The name means drake (male duck) and the dance has evolved from a wedding march into a
show-off dance for men. A variation of steps allows us to incorporate women into the dance
so that it can be done either as a couple dance or as an individual dance for men. The version
described below is for couples and does not involve the more complicated walking in a
squatted position that the men would do if dancing alone. Choreographed by: Richard
Schmidt (2007).

Presented by Richard Schmidt in 2008. View pdf here.

Kak za lugom – Как за лугом

This dance is set to a traditional lyrical round dance song from Siberia. Traditionally, the round dance (khorovod) is usually a slow and easy dance which is danced in a closed circle or open line to the vocal accompaniment of the dancers. Contemporary round dances composed in the last century to lyrical songs and music have often more figures and are referred to as lyrical round dances. This lyrical round dance was choreographed by Hennie Konings based on traditional dance material. The dance was first presented in Germany in 2005. Translation: “Behind the field”, from the first line of the accompanying song.

Presented by Radboud Koop in 2008. View pdf here.

Kalana Kauai

Hula
CD:  Aloha, Merilyn Gentry & Nora Nuckles, Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2008, Band 1, 2.  4/4 meter Starting Position: Ready hand position (arms with elbows bent, hands at waist with uli uli tops toward audience. Note: Every time the uli ulis hit the body, the position is parallel to the floor, tops twd sides.

Presented by Merilyn Gentry & Nora Nuckles in 2008. View pdf here.

Kujawiak—The Dance of Romance

Originating in the Kujawy (Koo-YAH-vy) region of Poland, the Kujawiak is without a
doubt the most romantic of Poland’s five national dances. So popular are the melancholy
rhythms and beautiful movements that it is done in every part of Poland and interpreted
by artists around the world. The Kujawiak, due to its slower tempo, is a natural partner to
the vibrant and quick Oberek, many of which come from the central region of Łowicz,
and is therefore mostly performed by Polish Dance Ensembles in the Łowicz costume
(seen here on the right), however, as it is a national dance, it can be done in any of
Poland’s regional costumes. The Kujawiak is even included in many of today’s ballroom
dance competitions held in Poland, alongside the Cha Chas and Viennese Waltzes. This
beautiful interpretation will take you through the steps of a courtship.

Presented by Richard Schmidt in 2008. View pdf here.

Koljovo Horo

This dance is a variation of the popular Râka and Tropanka widespread throughout Dobrudža. This version comes from an area of villages west of Varna.
Pronunciation:  KOH-lyoh-voh hoh-ROH  Translation: Kolyo's (man's name) dance
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 3
Formation:  Mixed lines or open circle; hands joined up in W-pos; wt on L ft, face ctr.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Kolomiyka - Коломийка

Kolomiyka is a dance from Western Ukraine, with its origins in the Carpathians. This version of the
dance was choreographed by George and Irina Arabagi.
Pronunciation:  koh-loh-MIGH-kah
Music:  2/4 meter  Ukrainian Dance Workshop, Track 1
Formation:  Mixed circle facing CCW. M’s hands are clasped behind his back. W’s thumbs are
in an imaginary vest.

Presented by George & Irina Arabagi in 2012. View pdf here.

Komarevsko Horo

A dance from Komarevo (Mosquitoville) near Pleven, North Bulgaria. It combines elements of the Pajduško in 5/8 meter and the Dajovo in 9/8 meter. It is danced to the song Radka Platno Tâe made famous by the legendary singer Boris Mašalov. Learned in Bulgaria from Živko Petrov in 1970.

Pronunciation:  Koh-MAH-ref-skoh hoh-ROH
Music: Yves Moreau CD YM-UOP-07, track 7
Rhythm: 5/8 + 9/8. Counted here as 1-2, 1-2-3, 1-2, 1-2, 1-2, 1-2-3 or
Q-S-Q-Q-Q-S (1,2, 3,4,5,6)
Formation: Short mixed lines, hands joined down in V-pos. Face LOD, wt on L.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2007. View pdf here.

Krajdunavsko Horo

The title translates as “Dance from the Danube River Area.” The Danube River forms the natural border between Romania and Bulgaria. The influence of the Vlach minorities is very present in the musical and dance folklore of North Bulgaria. The Vlachs (derived from Wallachia, now a province of Romania) were originally a nomad tribe. They settled in different areas of the Balkan Peninsula. Many villages in N.W. Bulgaria and the Danube plain region have a high concentration of Vlachs or Vlach-related descendants. They brought with them their own language, traditions, and costume. One of those is the ritual known as Kalušari. The North Bulgarian dances with Vlach influences are known as Vlaško or Krajdunavsko. Very characteristic are the syncopations in the rhythm and stamps of the dances. The following Krajdunavski variations were learned by Jaap Leegwater from Jordan Jordanov in the town of Russe in the spring of 1979.

Presented by Jaap Leegwater in 2011. View pdf here.

La Champeloise

An easy mixer from the Nantes area. It’s a variation of the popular dance called “Circassian circle.” Learned from Hubert Sellier, Montréal, January 25, 2005.
Pronunciation: lah sham-pah-LOHW-zha
Music: CD “Cocorico,” Band 9. 2/4 meter
Formation: Circle of cpls, all facing LOD. Inside hands joined in W-pos. Outside hands are free.

Presented by Michèle Brosseau and Germain Hébert in 2007. View pdf here.

La noce des oiseaux

The dance set to this song about the lark wishing to marry the finch is based on the basic widespread Quebec dance figure called Coupez par 6, par 4, par 2. Adapted by France Bourque-Moreau.
Translation: The wedding of the birds
Pronunciation: lah NOHSS dayz wa-ZOH

Music: 2/4 meter CD: Yves & France Moreau Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2009, Band 16.
Formation: Four (4) cpls in a square.

Presented by France Bourque-Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

La Virondée

A round bourrée with a “waltz” chorus. Morvan is located between the departments of Nièvre and Côte d’Or. It is a mountain area (Massif du Morvan) a bit isolated and has a bourrée style of its own.
Pronunciation: lah vee-RAWN-day
Music: CD “Cocorico”, Band 5 3/8 meter
Formation: Circle of cpls in single file, all facing LOD: M are in front of their ptr. M’s hands are free; W hold their skirt.

Presented by Michèle Brosseau and Germain Hébert in 2007. View pdf here.

La Chacarera

This dance is found in all parts of Argentina. It is lively and happy, expressing gallantry and romance. The man and woman dance apart. It is similar to other dances such El Gato, El Escondido and El Remedio, among others. Historically, first mention of it was made in the 1850s.
Chacareras use a rhythm that is “ternario” – a measure of three parts (triplets) in 6/8 time, with the bass or drum percussion in 3/4 time.

Presented by Pampa Cortés in 2013. View pdf here.

Leolam Be’ikvot Hashemesh

A line dance for children choreographed in 1996 by Levy Bar-Gil.
Pronunciation:  leh-oh-LAHM beh-eek-VOHT hah-MEHSH
Translation:  Forever Following the Sun
Music:  4/4 meter  Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2011
Erica Goldman - Israeli Folk Dances CD, Tracks 11&12
Formation:  Individuals dancing independently, all facing front of room.

Presented by Erica Goldman in 2011. View pdf here.

Les mains blanches

This dance is done in various regions of Quebec. This version is from the Lanaudiere region, northeast of Montreal. The "mains blanches" in this version, refers to the people forming a "trio." This is a shortened version of the complete dance in which all cpls become active.

Presented by France Bourque-Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

Lesnoto Majka

This dance is seen all over Macedonia. It is done at many gathering occasions like weddings, name days picnics, and parties.
Pronunciation:  LEHSS-noh-toh MAHY-kah
Music:  7/8 meter, counted 1 2 3 Makedonski Narodni Pesni i Ora, Stockton Folkdance Camp 2011, Band 7
Formation:  Mixed line or open circle; hands joined in W-position.

Presented by Fusae Senzaki-Carroll in 2011. View pdf here.

Let’el golub – Летел голубь

This dance is a lyrical round dance for unmarried girls. The title is taken from the first line of the
accompanying song meaning “a pigeon flew.” The song is a traditional round dance song from the Ural region, telling about a pigeon that brings news about the unhappy girl who is married off far away, and the other girls advising her to reconcile to her fate. The dance is choreographed by Hennie Konings based on typical elements of the Russian folk dance school. It was first presented in Frankfurt, Germany, in 2010.

Presented by Radboud Koop in 2010. View pdf here.

 

Liljano Mome

A variation of the popular Širto type of dance common throughout the Pirin-Macedonia region of
Bulgaria. This version was introduced by Belčo Stanev from Varna.
Pronunciation: lee-LYAH-noh MOH-meh
Music:7/8 meter (SQQ) CD:  Yves Moreau Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2009, Band 9
Formation: Mixed open circle; hands in W-pos; face LOD, wt on L.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

Lilli Burlero

Lilli Burlero was published in Playford's, The Dancing Master, in 1690. Cecil Sharp published his
version in the Country Dance Book, vol IV in 1916. Shimer & Keller published their research on the
dance in The Playford Ball, 1990.

Music: 6/8 meter CD:English Dances presented by Bruce Hamilton, Band 5.
Formation: Longways duple minor set.

Presented by Bruce Hamilton in 2009. View pdf here.

Łysy

From the town of Biłgoraj (beehw-GOH-righ) in the southeastern part of Poland
comes the dance Łysy (WEE-see), which means “bald-headed.” A strange name
indeed, but the name is derived from the lyrics of the song that accompanies the
melody. This dance is also found in the Ukraine under the name “Marysiu.” The
lyrics of the song and the melody have a strong Jewish influence.
Biłgoraj folklore has only recently become popular in the Polish Folk world due to
the passion of one instructor who teaches this region at the “Instructors’ Course”
given in Poland each year to young students from around the world. I learned this
dance in 2010 from one of my students, Matt Malacha, who took the course and
returned with an abundance of notes in hand, full of eagerness to choreograph a
Biłgoraj suite.

Presented by Richard Schmidt in 2012. View pdf here.

 

Malhao

This couple dance is from Vila Nova de Gaia in northwest Portugal. I t has been danced for more than 100 years. It was first taught by Louise and Germain Hebert, Yves Moreau and Marianne Taylor.
Pronunciation:  mah-YEOW
Music:  2/4 meter  Dances of Portugal, Track #1
Formation:  Partners face each other in contra lines.

Presented by Andy Taylor-Blenis in 2011. View pdf here.

 

Mali Izvorski Opas

A variation on the popular Opas dance type found throughout Dobrudža. From the village of
Mali Izvor near the town of Dobrič.
Translation: Opas from the village of Mali Izvor
Pronunciation: MAH-lee EEZ-vohr-skee OH-pahss

Music:2/4 meter CD:  Yves Moreau Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2009, Band 6.

Formation: Short lines , belt hold, L over R or front basket hold or optional V-Pos. Wt on L. Face ctr.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2009. View pdf here.

 

 

 

Malowane Łoze (Żywiec)

In the Beskid mountains, the local folk (Górale) of Żywiec, like all mountain folk throughout the south of Poland, have a style of music and dance unlike other parts of Poland. I choreographed
this dance, which is a compilation of typical steps and movements, to a song recorded by the young singers of the Tatry Folk Dance Ensemble from Oshawa, Ontario, whom I have the
pleasure of teaching. I chose the name “Malowane Łoze” (mah-LOH-vah-neh WHAW-zeh) because of the lyrics, which means “painted bed,” and it seems to fit the youthful voices that are
singing. This is a progressive couple dance.

Presented by Richard Schmidt in 2012. View pdf here.

 

Maracá de Lelê

This dance was choreographed by Lucia Cordeiro in 2008 to music by Edgar Morais (CD “Naçao Canta Pernambuco”). The rhythm and the song are referred to as maracatu and it belongs to the Carnival parade in the northeastern part of Brazil. The roots of the maracatu are the processions of African royalty brought to Brazil as slaves. It’s like a street opera, with many figures and characters. Above all, the Queen of Maracatu, who reigns and leads all the parade, moves with her dance.

Presented by Lucia Cordeiro in 2013. View pdf here.

 

Margaret’s Waltz

Dance and tune by Pat Shaw, published in English Dance & Song, Vol. 23, No. 3, 1959.
Music:  3/4 meter Aardvark Ceilidh Band, Pleasures of the Town, Track 11
Bruce Hamilton, Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2011, Track 9
Formation:  Sicilian Circle.
Steps & Styling: Running step, ballroom waltz. Please also refer to English Country Dance
Glossary.

Presented by Bruce Hamilton  in 2011. View pdf here.

Margot’s Valsen

Svein Olav Solli, Borghild Reitan (now Solli) and Margot Sollie introduced this dance at Scandia Camp Mendocino 1997. They said that the dance is quite popular in the Røros area and is referred to there as Margots valsen. I believe this dance is referred to as Kalle P’s vals in Sweden. The dance mixes at the beginning. Dance one time through the dance sequence with your original partner, progress for the next repetition.

Presented by Roo Lester in 2009. View pdf here.

Mazurca Di Sant’Andieu

This dance is a mazurka that originated in the south of France during the Occitan Kingdom and is now danced all over Piedmont. The song to this dance was written by Charloun Rieu, pioneer of the modern provençal literature and poetry, who covered on foot all the Alps to spread the provençal language and to delight with his songs “The Shepherds and The Peasants.”

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Mehmede

“Memede, dobâr junače” (“Mehmed, you are a brave lad”) is the first line of the song to which the dance was originally performed. The patterns described here are from the village of Jakoruda, Velingradsko district in the Rhodopes.
Pronunciation:  MEHH-meh-deh
Music:  5/8 meter counted 1-2 1-2-3 or 1-2 or Q-S
Bulgarian Folk Dances with Jaap Leegwater, Stockton Edition, Track 14

Presented by Jaap Leegwater in 2011. View pdf here.

Men Gülem

Pronunciation: MEHN gyool-LEHM
CD: Ahmet Lüleci Turkish Dances, Band 8. 6/8 Meter
Formation: W only or mixed W and M. Two circles. If mixed, M on outside circle, facing and moving CW, W in the inside circle, facing and moving CCW. If dancers are all W, W may all face in
the same direction, or some W will face CW alternating with W facing CCW. Arms free as indicated below.

Presented by Ahmet Lüleci in 2007. View pdf here.

Mandrile

This is a dance performed mainly by women from the village of Vrav in Northwest Bulgaria, the Vidin–Danube river area. “Mandrile” is Vlach word that means “beauty.” The dance is performed with instrumental accompaniment. The dance pattern is symmetrical: 8 measures to the right, 8 measures to the left.
Pronunciation:  MUHN-dreh-leh
Music:  Ya si te daruvam surtseto, dushata CD (I Give You My Heart, 5/8 meter, counted QS My Soul) Songs & Dances from Bulgaria, Macedonia, & Serbia. Band 6. Dances from Serbia & Northwest Bulgaria. Band 3.

Presented by Daniela Ivanova in 2008. View pdf here.

 

Maneaua

Maneaua is a Rom (gypsy) dance from the south of Romania which reflects the oriental influence. It is usually done in Oltenia, Muntenia and Dobrogea (costal area of Danube) and also in few Bulgarian villages of the north.
Pronunciation:  mah-N(EH)AH-oo-ah
Music:  Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu, Special Edition, Band 13 or Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu
Vol. 3, Band 8  2/4 meter

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2008. View pdf here.

 

Mariikinata

This is a dance choreographed to accompany the popular Macedonian song (“Mama na Mariika Dumashe”) based on a traditional dance pattern from Pirin Macedonia known as Deninka. The dance here is performed both by men and women, and with vocal and instrumental accompaniment. The dance pattern includes 3 figures.

Presented by Daniela Ivanova in 2008. View pdf here.

Momino Horo

This is an arrangement by Yves Moreau based on traditional Vlach women’s dance steps from the
region of Lom on the Danube in Northwest Bulgaria.
Pronunciation:  moh-MEE-noh hoh-ROH  Translation: Young women's dance
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 4
Formation:  Line or open circle with hands joined in W-pos. Face R of ctr, wt on L.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Moneco—not taught

This dance from Emilia-Romagna in northern Italy is also called Muneco. It is a kind of Contradance very well known both in Emilia-Romagna and Polesine (Veneto). According to many researchers it comes from a French dance called Monaco brought into Italy by the French Napoleonic Army and danced in the territory of Ferrara.

Presented by Roberto Bagnoli in 2009. View pdf here.

Morena do Mar

This dance was choreographed by Lucia Cordeiro in 2007 to music by Dorival Caymmi (Bahia). The singer is Edil Pacheco. This is one of the classical pieces of “beach music” from Dorival Caymmi, a great Brazilian composer from the last century. It's a love song. This Afro-Brazilian rhythm is called afoxe and has a smooth, gentle beat that reproduces the ocean tides. The words refer to a man’s passion for a brunette. All the gifts he brings her are attributes of Yemanja, goddess of the sea.

Presented by Lucia Cordeiro in 2013. View pdf here.

Morpeth Rant

Morpeth Rant was published in Kennedy’s Community Dances Manual 1949-1967.

Music: 2/2 meter CD:English Dances presented by Bruce Hamilton, Band 9.
Formation: Longways duple minor set.
Steps: Rant Travelling Step. Rant Setting Step. (See “English Country Dance Glossary.”)
Swing and Change: Using Rant Travelling Step, in Ballroom or shldr/shldr-blade pos,
dance around other cpl 1½ times to end in progressed place.

Presented by Bruce Hamilton in 2009. View pdf here.
 

Na dvi strane

More than 70,000 Croatians inhabit the southern, central and western parts
of Hungary today, where they continue to preserve the heritage, language
and culture of their ancestors. Baranja is an area which straddles the border
between northeastern Croatia and southwestern Hungary. Croatians, who
have lived there for many generations, inhabit the villages in Hungary near
the town of Pécs. Their dances retain their Slavic character, with little or no
influence from the surrounding Hungarian culture. Željko was researching
Croatian culture in the summer of 1992 around the city of Pécs.

Presented by Željko Jergan in 2009. View pdf here.

Na Lhu Uan (那魯彎)

The song is familiar to everybody in Taiwan, and the original songwriter is Tsu-Yang Gau from
Chihben in Taitung County. During the past era, when the Taiwanese were forbidden to hold an
assembly or form a union of any kind, Tsu-Yang Gau was taken into custody and severely disciplined because of this song. Na Lhu Wan belongs to Taiwan’s aboriginal language, which is a branch of the Southern-Pacific Island languages. While some people say it comes from the Tsao tribe on Mt. Ali, Na Lhu Wan may represent different meanings under different circumstances. For example, it may mean “I love you” in a love song, “How are you” in a greeting, or “Good bye” or “Take care” when meeting friends. Some also use it to stand for “hometown.” The dance, based on the steps of the aborigines, was choreographed by Fang-Chich Chen in 2004.

Presented by Fang-Chich Chen in 2010. View pdf here.

Nar

This is a choreography by Ziva Emtiyaz that takes dance moves from the Sa’idi people and Raqs al Sharqui. Translation of the title: “Fire.”
Pronunciation:  NAHR
Music:  4/4 meter  Dance with Ziva Emtiyaz 2013 Middle Eastern Music Mix, Track 2
Formation:  Individuals

Presented by Ziva Emtiyaz in 2013. View pdf here.

Narino

Pronunciation: nah-REE-noh (a girl’s name) This is also a girl’s dance.
Music: Ahmet Lüleci Turkish Dances, Band 4. 4/4 and 6/4 meter
Formation: Semi circle, hands joined in V-pos.
Styling: Movements are soft and subtle, not sharp.

Presented by Ahmet Lüleci in 2007. View pdf here.

Nikendre

This dance is a men’s dance from the Aegean Sea island of Amorgos. This island was featured in two popular films, The Big Blue (1988) and Ariadni (2002).
Pronunciation:  nee-kehn-DREH
Music:  2/4 meter  Timeless Sounds, Track 5
Formation:  Lines of dancers in T-pos.

Presented by Lilian Vlandi in 2013. View pdf here.

Niška Rumenka

This is a dance from the city of Niš, southern Serbia. This used to be a women’s dance, with men joining for Fig II, but is now danced by all.
Pronunciation:  NISH-kah roo-MEHN-kah
Music:  2/4 meter  Serbian Folk Dance, Vol. 3, Track 8
Formation:  Open circle, belt hold or V-pos

Presented by Miroslav “Bata” Marčetić in 2012. View pdf here.

Naroy Naroy

Naroy is a man’s name. The dance is an example of the style of dances of the Shoror family. Shoror literally means a to and fro movement of the torso. A traditional dance from Sasoun and Moush region (present Turkey).
Taught by Liudvig Poghosian (dance tour to Armenia, May 2007).
Pronunciation:  NAHR-oh-ee NAHR-oh-ee
Music:  Barev-Armenian Dances, Band 4 (traditional) and Band 5 (modern).  6/4 meter
Formation:  Closed circle, little fingers interlocked, arms in W-pos a little forward, facing ctr.

Presented by Tineke van Geel in 2008. View pdf here.

Ninoyem

Nino is a man’s name. Ninoyem means “I am Nino.” It is a traditional dance from Musaler, a region in former West Armenia, present Anatolia (Turkey). Taught by Liudvig Poghosian (dance tour to Armenia, May 2007).
Pronunciation:  Nee-noh-YEHM
Music:  Barev-Armenian Dances, Band 6.  4/4 meter
Formation: Closed circle, join hands in V-pos, face ctr.

Presented by Tineke van Geel in 2008. View pdf here.

Oj Dimitro Le

This is a dance from Northwest Bulgaria that Yves learned from Belčo Stanev.
Pronunciation:  oy dee-MEE-troh leh  Translation: Oh, Dimitra (woman’s name)
Music:  2/4 meter  Yves Moreau Stockton FDC 2013, Track 2
Formation:  Mixed lines. Hands joined down in V-pos. Face ctr, wt on L ft.
Steps & Styling: Light and happy.

Presented by Yves Moreau in 2013. View pdf here.

Opincuţa

Opincuţa is a fast Hora from the Balţi region. One of the remarkable characteristics of the Hora family is the arm movement, as the arms are held in W-pos. Usually the hands create small circles and thus give a dynamic and enticing feel to the dance. However, the movement should always be done with a certain nimbleness and subtlety. This dance is performed through a magnificent interpretation of a popular song by a choir of Moldavian children. The crystal clear and warm voices of these kids make you want to dance with pleasure and vigor.

Presented by Sonia Dion & Cristian Florescu in 2008. View pdf here.

Or

This line dance was created in 2006 at Camp Alonim, Brandeis, California. Camp Alonim is a summer camp for Jewish youth.
Pronunciation:  OHR  Translation: Light
Music:4/4 meter  Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2011 Erica Goldman - Israeli Folk Dances CD, Track 7
Formation:  Individual dancers facing the front of the hall.
Steps & Styling:  Light and bouncy, with individual interpretation appropriate.

Presented by Erica Goldman in 2011. View pdf here.

Ore Boggy

This dance is from Neal, Choice Collection, 1726. Reconstruction by George Fogg and Rich Jackson, 1990.
Pronunciation:  OHR BOG-ee
Music:  2/2 meter  Bare Necessities, By Request, Track 14 Bruce Hamilton, Stockton Folk Dance Camp 2011, Track 4
Formation:  Longways duple minor set.
Steps & Styling: Running step.

Presented by Bruce Hamilton in 2011. View pdf here.

Ordu

Ordu is the name of a city near the Black Sea in Northern Anatolia from which this dance comes. The original name of the tune is “Ordu’nun isiklari”—the lights of Ordu. It is also known as “Vona’nin isiklari,” “Vona” being the Greek name for Ordu.
Pronunciation:  OHR-doo
Music:  4/4 meter  Ahmet Lüleci Stockton 2010, Band 9
Formation:  Semi-circle, standing close together. Clasp hands, elbows bent so forearms are less
than parallel to the ground.

Presented by Ahmet Lüleci in 2010. View pdf here.